Officials from the Norwegian Nature Inspectorate discovered hundreds of dead reindeer on a mountain plateau after a lightning storm. Havard Kjontvedt/Norwegian Nature Inspectorate hide caption

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Havard Kjontvedt/Norwegian Nature Inspectorate

You don't have to be outdoors to be hurt or injured by a nearby lightning strike, like this one in New Mexico. The pain for survivors can be lifelong. Marko Korosec/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

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Marko Korosec/Barcroft Media/Landov

'When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors' To Best Avoid Lightning's Pain

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Lightning strikes near Ben Hill Griffin Stadium at Florida Field in Gainesville, Fla., in August. A new study says a rise in average global temperatures due to climate change will increase the frequency of lightning strikes. Phil Sandlin/AP hide caption

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Phil Sandlin/AP