Lt. Cmdr. Stephen Mannino checks a sailor for skin cancer the old-fashioned way during a screening exam at Naval Amphibious Base Coronado in San Diego. MC2 Dominique M. Lasco/U.S. Navy hide caption

itoggle caption MC2 Dominique M. Lasco/U.S. Navy

Stefano Amabili walks under the sun in Miami Beach, Florida, in May. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention has found that more people are using sunscreen and protecting themselves from the sun's rays. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Which one of these sunscreens would be considered safe and correctly labeled by the Food and Drug Administration? Not a single one. Safe sunscreens are SPF15 or higher, and the new rules require those with broad-spectrum protection to include the term next to and in the same style as the sun protection factor. Benjamin Morris/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Benjamin Morris/NPR

Alivia Parker, 21 months at the time, ran through circles of spraying water on a hot day in Montgomery, Ala., last June. She was wearing sunscreen with an SPF of 100, a rating that won't be allowed much longer. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Dave Martin/AP

Hair stylists already spend a lot of time staring at the back of people's heads. Researchers thought: Why not train them to check for suspicious lesions and other signs of skin cancer while they're at it?

Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Seth Wenig/AP