Medical worker Abaare Hussein extracts a Guinea worm from a child's leg in Savelugu Village in northern Ghana in 2007. Wes Pope/Chicago Tribune/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Wes Pope/Chicago Tribune/MCT via Getty Images

The Last Days Of Guinea Worm

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480669616/480989054" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Courtesy of Johns Hopkins University Press

The Epidemiologist Who Crushed The Glass Ceiling And Media Stupidity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474368198/474600050" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This did not really happen. Cows' heads did not emerge from the bodies of people newly inoculated against smallpox. But fear of the vaccine was so widespread that it prompted British satirist James Gillray to create this spoof in 1802. H. Humphrey/Henry Barton Jacobs Collection, Institute of the History of Medicine, JHU hide caption

toggle caption H. Humphrey/Henry Barton Jacobs Collection, Institute of the History of Medicine, JHU

A Cow Head Will Not Erupt From Your Body If You Get A Smallpox Vaccine

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/375598652/375672051" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The CDC's director, Tom Frieden, testified before a congressional subcommittee Wednesday regarding a recent anthrax incident and lab safety improvements he is instituting. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption AFP/Getty Images

Head Scientist At CDC Weighs Costs Of Recent Lab Safety Breaches

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/332337425/332498808" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Particles of H5N1 virus — a particularly dangerous type of bird flu that can infect people — attack lung cells. Chris Bjornberg/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption Chris Bjornberg/Science Source

Feds Tighten Lab Security After Anthrax, Bird Flu Blunders

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/330725773/330760949" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Marine Sgt. Robert Scoggin gets a vaccination against smallpox in 2003 at Camp Pendleton in California — one of the final steps before deployment overseas. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption David McNew/Getty Images

Keep Or Kill Last Lab Stocks Of Smallpox? Time To Decide, Says WHO

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/310475511/311119423" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript