Used syringes rest in a pile at a needle exchange clinic in St. Johnsbury, Vt. The CDC says needle exchanges like this one, where users can obtain clean needles, help reduce the rates of death and transmission among those suffering from hepatitis C. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Puerto Rico resident Michelle Flandez caresses her two-month-old son Inti Perez, diagnosed with microcephaly linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the Zika virus continues to impact a small number of pregnant women and their babies in the U.S. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carlos Giusti/AP

Under the old rules, the CDC's authority was primarily limited to detaining travelers entering the U.S. or crossing state lines. With the new rules, the CDC would be able to detain people anywhere in the country, without getting approval from state and local officials. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

CDC Seeks Controversial New Quarantine Powers To Stop Outbreaks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/512678115/512998472" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Florida Department of Health workers at a temporary clinic set up in Miami Beach in September package up a urine sample to be tested for the Zika virus. Pregnant women in Texas and Florida have complained it can take as long as a month or more to get their Zika test results. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Shooting victims Patience Carter of Philadelphia (left) and Angel Santiago (right) listen as Dr. Brian Vickaryous speaks during a news conference Tuesday regarding the treatment of victims of the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando, Fla. Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP

An aerial view of the Hiram Bithorn Stadium as Puerto Rico plays Dominican Republic at the Caribbean Series baseball tournament in San Juan, Puerto Rico in February. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ricardo Arduengo/AP

None of the biocontainment treatment centers in U.S. hospitals were specifically designed for kids — until now. Texas Children's Hospital aims to fill that gap. Courtesy of Texas Children's Hospital hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Texas Children's Hospital

Kids With Ebola, Bird Flu Or TB? Texas Children's Hospital Will Be Ready

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/444254315/444790924" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

During a news conference on Sunday, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Chief Clinical Officer Dr. Daniel Varga answers questions about a health care worker who now has Ebola after providing care for Thomas Eric Duncan. Varga is expected to testify before a House panel looking into Ebola response. Brandon Wade/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Brandon Wade/AP

A World Health Organization worker trains nurses how to use Ebola protective gear in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Michael Duff/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Duff/AP

Dire Predictions On Ebola's Spread From Top Health Organizations

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/350937467/350946988" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Shops are closed in Monrovia's West Point neighborhood as part of a quarantine to contain the spread of Ebola. Zoom Dosso/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Zoom Dosso/AFP/Getty Images

CDC Director On Ebola: 'We Are Definitely Not At The Peak'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/343436300/343484355" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A health worker cleans his hands with chlorinated water before entering an Ebola screening tent at the Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone. More than 300 Sierra Leoneans have died of the disease. Michael Duff/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Duff/AP

Even With $100 Million, WHO Says It Will Take Months To Control Ebola

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/340638434/340700448" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript