Khadra Abdulle, a resident of St. Paul, stops to shop at the Riverside Market in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood of Minneapolis. It's the inaccurate information about a link between vaccines and autism, she says, that's keeping some well-meaning parents from getting their kids vaccinated against measles. Mark Zdechlik/MPR hide caption

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Mark Zdechlik/MPR

Unfounded Autism Fears Are Fueling Minnesota's Measles Outbreak

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Vials of measles, mumps and rubella vaccine are displayed on a counter at a Walgreens Pharmacy in 2015 in Mill Valley, California. Photo illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Scientists placed two clusters of cultured forebrain cells side by side (each cluster the size of a head of a pin). Within days, the "minibrains" had fused and particular neurons (in green) migrated from the left side to the right side, as subsets of cells do in a real brain. Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University hide caption

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Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University

'Minibrains' In A Dish Shed A Little Light On Autism And Epilepsy

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Julia (center) first appeared online and in printed materials as a part of Sesame Street's See Amazing in all Children initiative. She'll now appear on TV as well. From left, Elmo, Alan Muraoka, Julia, Abby Cadabby and Big Bird. Zach Hyman/Sesame Workshop hide caption

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Zach Hyman/Sesame Workshop

Julia, A Muppet With Autism, Joins The Cast Of 'Sesame Street'

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Shaw, 8, plays an improv game with Erin McTiernan, an Indiana State University doctoral student. Shaw is a participant in an improv class at Indiana State University for children with high functioning autism. Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Using Improv To Help Kids With Autism Show And Read Emotion

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Robert F. Kennedy Jr. in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York, Tuesday, after meeting with President-elect Donald Trump. Kennedy said Trump put him in charge of a commission on "vaccine safety." Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Colin Ozeki, a high school student with autism, is on track to graduate this year from Millennium Brooklyn High School with an advanced diploma. Amy Pearl/WNYC hide caption

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Amy Pearl/WNYC

Getting Students With Autism Through High School, To College And Beyond

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Anthony Merkerson and Charles Jones, on a visit with StoryCorps in New York City. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

From Father To Father, A Few Words Of Wisdom On Raising Kids With Autism

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Gerald Franklin, who was diagnosed with autism as a child, is now lead developer for a website that matches workers with prospective employers. Job-related videos, he says, can help people with special needs showcase their talent. Courtesy of Gerald Franklin hide caption

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Courtesy of Gerald Franklin

Autism Can Be An Asset In The Workplace, Employers And Workers Find

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