Images of the developing fetal brain show connections among brain regions. Allen Institute for Brain Science; Bruce Fischl, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital hide caption

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Map Of The Developing Human Brain Shows Where Problems Begin

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Researchers say intervention in early childhood may help the developing brain compensate by rewiring to work around the trouble spots. iStockphoto hide caption

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Brain Changes Suggest Autism Starts In The Womb

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Clinical specialist Catey Funaiock took notes while observing a 5-year-old boy at the Marcus Autism Center, part of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, in September. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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A newly discovered neural circuit in the brain of the common fruit fly seems to serve as a sort of "volume control," turning up and down the perception of sound and light. Nicholas Monu/iStockphoto hide caption

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Can A Fruit Fly Help Explain Autism?

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The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children have no more than two hours a day of "screen time." Marilyn Nieves/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Instructional assistant Jessica Reeder touches her nose to get Jacob Day, 3, who has autism, to focus his attention on her during a therapy session in April 2007. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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The Human Voice May Not Spark Pleasure In Children With Autism

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Amelia Schabel, 23, works with art director Andrew LaBounty at the nonPareil Institute in Plano, Texas. Courtesy of nonPareil hide caption

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Young Adults With Autism Can Thrive In High-Tech Jobs

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A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds no link between the number of vaccinations a young child receives and the risk of developing autism spectrum disorders. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Number Of Early Childhood Vaccines Not Linked To Autism

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A guinea pig does its part for science and human relations by sitting on the lap of an autistic child. Erin Burnett/Courtesy of Maggie O'Haire hide caption

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Despite public health campaigns urging women in the U.S. to take folic acid, many are still not taking the supplements when they become pregnant. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Folic Acid For Pregnant Mothers Cuts Kids' Autism Risk

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Jonathan Mitchell is autistic and wants to donate his brain to science when he dies. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Shortage Of Brain Tissue Hinders Autism Research

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