A man stands near collapsed houses in Bhaktapur, on the outskirts of Kathmandu, on April 27, two days after a magnitude-7.8 earthquake hit Nepal. Aftershocks tend to get less frequent with time, scientists say, but not necessarily gentler. Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Big Aftershocks In Nepal Could Persist For Years

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In Joplin today: Some of the destruction. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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'It's Definitely Easier To Engineer For An Earthquake' Than Tornadoes

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