A nurse in Hyderabad, India, gives a vaccine to a child. The immunization will protect against diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus and other diseases. Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Parents In Poor Countries Worry About Vaccines, Too
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A nurse holds a young girl who was vaccinated at the kickoff of a national measles prevention campaign in Liberia. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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As Ebola Leaves Liberia, Measles Makes A Forceful Comeback
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Worth a little pain? Back in 1990, a school boy got a measles shot in the U.K., and it turns out, he got more than protection against the measles. Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists Crack A 50-Year-Old Mystery About The Measles Vaccine
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Health worker Jackie Carnegie delivers a rubella vaccine in Colorado in 1972. Ira Gay Sealy/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Western Hemisphere Wipes Out Its Third Virus
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People who oppose repealing the personal belief exemption gathered outside California's Capitol in Sacramento on Wednesday. Pauline Bartolone/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Bill To Limit Vaccine Exemptions Moves A Step Closer In California
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Measles is highly contagious, and it produces fever and rash in susceptible people who become infected. Hazel Appleton/Health Protection Agency Centre/Science Source hide caption

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Why A Court Once Ordered Kids Vaccinated Against Their Parents' Will
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Measles vaccine isn't a part of most workplaces. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Can Employers Require Workers To Be Vaccinated? It Depends
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To Get Parents To Vaccinate Their Kids, Don't Ask. Just Tell
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This World Health Organization map shows the percent of the population vaccinated for measles in each country in 2013. Dark green is at least 90 percent. Light green is 80 to 89 percent. Orange is 50 to 79 percent. Red is less than 50 percent. Courtesy of WHO hide caption

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