Following the example set in Pakistan, the government of Bangladesh is having the mobile operator Grameenphone, which is majority-owned by Telenor, fingerprint SIM card customers. This is an FAQ on the biometric program. Grameenphone hide caption

toggle caption Grameenphone

After Terrorist Attack, A Phone Company Is Beating Google At Big Data

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/468574508/468937776" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Employers are increasingly using mobile recruitment tools to make applying for jobs easier and quicker. Jun Tsuboike/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Jun Tsuboike/NPR

Mobile Recruiting: The Key To Your Next Job Could Be In Your Pocket

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/458889853/458889854" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Fairfax County 911 Center in Virginia takes calls during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. It was relatively easy to locate callers when most people used landlines. But most 911 calls now come from cellphones, which can pinpoint a callers' location only within 100 to 300 meters. Greg E. Mathieson Sr./Mai/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Greg E. Mathieson Sr./Mai/Landov

Calling 911 On Your Cell? It's Harder To Find You Than You Think

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/358307881/358363585" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos introduces the new Amazon Fire phone June 18 in Seattle. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ted S. Warren/AP

Is Amazon's Failed Phone A Cautionary Tale?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/347486671/347595038" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Beijing, anxious relatives continue to wait for word about the fate of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. The Beijing-bound jet disappeared on Saturday. Mark Ralston /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Mark Ralston /AFP/Getty Images

A passenger checks his cellphone while boarding a flight in Boston. The Federal Communications Commission is proposing new rules to allow using cellphones for data and voice calls during airline flights. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

toggle caption Matt Slocum/AP

The new head of the Federal Communications Commission says his agency is reviewing restrictions on in-flight cellphone use. Here, a passenger looks at her cellphone before a flight last month. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

toggle caption Matt Slocum/AP

The new head of the Federal Communications Commission proposes allowing airline passengers to make phone calls during flights. Here, a passenger looks at her cellphone before a flight last month. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

toggle caption Matt Slocum/AP

Cell towers are constantly tracking the location of mobile phones. And that data, federal courts have ruled, is not constitutionally protected. Steve Greer/iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption Steve Greer/iStockphoto.com

Who Has The Right To Know Where Your Phone Has Been?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/241415668/241549701" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A row of beer cans in Australia, where a man's beer fridge has been blamed for playing havoc with the cellphone network in several neighborhoods. Torsten Blackwood/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Torsten Blackwood/AFP/Getty Images

A young boy plays on a commode during an event for World Toilet Day in New Delhi in November. An estimated 131 million Indian homes don't have a latrine or a clean toilet. Raveendran/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Raveendran/AFP/Getty Images