The original caption to this 1989 photo read, "Cellular phones are being offered by many car manufacturers as optional equipment for drivers who can't bear to be out of touch, even on the road." Richard Sheinwald/AP hide caption

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Richard Sheinwald/AP

When Phones Went Mobile: Revisiting NPR's 1983 Story On 'Cellular'

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Liam Norris/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive

At This English Bar, An Old-School Solution To Rude Cellphones

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Protesters rally near the home of a girl who was raped in New Delhi on Oct. 17. The Indian government is trying to improve its emergency response system, particularly in cases of assault. Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

Following the example set in Pakistan, the government of Bangladesh is having the mobile operator Grameenphone, which is majority-owned by Telenor, fingerprint SIM card customers. This is an FAQ on the biometric program. Grameenphone hide caption

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Grameenphone

After Terrorist Attack, A Phone Company Is Beating Google At Big Data

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Employers are increasingly using mobile recruitment tools to make applying for jobs easier and quicker. Jun Tsuboike/NPR hide caption

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Jun Tsuboike/NPR

Mobile Recruiting: The Key To Your Next Job Could Be In Your Pocket

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The Fairfax County 911 Center in Virginia takes calls during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. It was relatively easy to locate callers when most people used landlines. But most 911 calls now come from cellphones, which can pinpoint a callers' location only within 100 to 300 meters. Greg E. Mathieson Sr./Mai/Landov hide caption

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Greg E. Mathieson Sr./Mai/Landov

Calling 911 On Your Cell? It's Harder To Find You Than You Think

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos introduces the new Amazon Fire phone June 18 in Seattle. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Is Amazon's Failed Phone A Cautionary Tale?

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