George Washington University is training doctors to understand the health care system as it also teaches them how to take care of patients. Team Static/fStop/Getty Images hide caption

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For Doctors-In-Training, A Dose Of Health Policy Helps The Medicine Go Down

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Medical students at George Washington University met with residents of Washington, D.C., to find out what challenges they face in managing asthma. Sarah Miknis/GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences hide caption

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This Med School Teaches Health Policy Along With The Pills

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Giselle is pursuing a career in family medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. For her, hiding her problems with anxiety and depression was not an option. Amanda Aronczyk/WNYC hide caption

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A Med Student Decides To Be Upfront About Her Mental Issues

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The unique medical program at the University of California, Berkeley is housed in its School of Public Health. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Belle Likover, a 96-year-old retired social worker, told Case Western Reserve medical students that growing old gracefully is all about being able to adapt to one's changing life situation, including health challenges. Lynn Ischay/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Tulane's medical school is one of the first to teach medical students how to cook healthful food, with the goal that they'll share that knowledge with patients. Jeff Kubina/Flickr hide caption

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Nurse practitioner Rachelle Quimpo begins an ear exam on Shreya Sasaki at a Kaiser Permanente health clinic inside a Target retail department store in San Diego, Calif., as Dr. Heidi Meyer watches via video. Kaiser says it will train medical students to provide good care beyond traditional medical settings. Mike Blake/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Is It Safe For Medical Residents To Work 30-Hour Shifts?

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(Left to right) NYU medical students Brian Chao, Michael Lui, Hye Min Choi, and Varun Vijay take the team approach to learning about the anatomy of cells, and how disease can disrupt them. Analyzing big data sets is now a routine part of their studies, too. Cindy Carpien for NPR hide caption

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Medical Students Crunch Big Data To Spot Health Trends

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Jeffrey Okonye (left) and Oviea Akpotaire are fourth-year medical students at the University of Texas Southwestern. Lauren Silverman/KERA hide caption

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There Were Fewer Black Men In Medical School In 2014 Than In 1978

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Belle Likover, a 95-year-old retired social worker, told Case Western Reserve medical students that growing old gracefully is all about being able to adapt to one's changing life situation, including health challenges. Lynn Ischay/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Isaiah Roggow, a third-year medical student at the University of California, Riverside, examines patient Becky Ketchum during the school's free clinic. Rebecca Plevin/KPCC hide caption

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Medical Schools Teach Students To Talk With Patients About Care Costs

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Can Health Care Be Cured Of Racial Bias?

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A New York study found that getting medical students together with dementia patients and their families at museums to view, discuss and create art for 90 minutes made the students better communicators. Colin Hawkins/Getty Images hide caption

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Travis Driscoll, a medical school applicant from Berkeley, Calif., studies for the revamped MCAT. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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Medical School Hopefuls Grapple With Overhauled Entrance Exam

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Dr. David Muller, dean of medical education at Mount Sinai, believes that including in each medical school class some students who have a strong background in the humanities makes traditional science students better doctors, too. Cindy Carpien for NPR hide caption

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A Top Medical School Revamps Requirements To Lure English Majors

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Dr. Raj Mangrulkar and medical student Jesse Burk-Rafel at the University of Michigan Medical School. Good communication skills, teamwork and adaptability will help doctors thrive through swift changes in medical science, Mangrulkar says. Leisa Thompson/Courtesy of University of Michigan Medical School hide caption

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Medical Schools Reboot For 21st Century

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NYU medical student Sara Stream (left) examines dancer Jazlyn Caing, who visited the clinic for low-grade orthopedic and respiratory problems. Fred Mogul/WNYC hide caption

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Medical Students Jump In To Help The Uninsured

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Third-year medical student Allie Tetreault, left, talks with Gabrielle Nuki, 16, at Maine Medical Center in Portland, Maine. Gabrielle helps med students practice patient care. Patti Wight/MPBN hide caption

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Pretending To Be A Medical Patient Pays Off For This Teen

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