(Left to right) NYU medical students Brian Chao, Michael Lui, Hye Min Choi, and Varun Vijay take the team approach to learning about the anatomy of cells, and how disease can disrupt them. Analyzing big data sets is now a routine part of their studies, too. Cindy Carpien for NPR hide caption

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Jeffrey Okonye (left) and Oviea Akpotaire are fourth-year medical students at the University of Texas Southwestern. Lauren Silverman/KERA hide caption

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Shots - Health News

There Were Fewer Black Men In Medical School In 2014 Than In 1978


Medical school applications have gone way up in the past few decades. But one group of applicants has not grown: black men.

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Belle Likover, a 95-year-old retired social worker, told Case Western Reserve medical students that growing old gracefully is all about being able to adapt to one's changing life situation, including health challenges. Lynn Ischay/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Isaiah Roggow, a third-year medical student at the University of California, Riverside, examines patient Becky Ketchum during the school's free clinic. Rebecca Plevin/KPCC hide caption

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A New York study found that getting medical students together with dementia patients and their families at museums to view, discuss and create art for 90 minutes made the students better communicators. Colin Hawkins/Getty Images hide caption

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Travis Driscoll, a medical school applicant from Berkeley, Calif., studies for the revamped MCAT. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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Dr. David Muller, dean of medical education at Mount Sinai, believes that including in each medical school class some students who have a strong background in the humanities makes traditional science students better doctors, too. Cindy Carpien for NPR hide caption

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Dr. Raj Mangrulkar and medical student Jesse Burk-Rafel at the University of Michigan Medical School. Good communication skills, teamwork and adaptability will help doctors thrive through swift changes in medical science, Mangrulkar says. Leisa Thompson/Courtesy of University of Michigan Medical School hide caption

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NYU medical student Sara Stream (left) examines dancer Jazlyn Caing, who visited the clinic for low-grade orthopedic and respiratory problems. Fred Mogul/WNYC hide caption

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Third-year medical student Allie Tetreault, left, talks with Gabrielle Nuki, 16, at Maine Medical Center in Portland, Maine. Gabrielle helps med students practice patient care. Patti Wight/MPBN hide caption

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First-year medical student Ngabo Nzigira gets ready to see a patient at a Kaiser Permanente facility in Sacramento. Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Chief Medical Resident Dr. Julia Vermylen (right) critiques interns during an "intern boot camp," held at Chicago's Northwestern Memorial Hospital in June. Stacy Thacker/AP hide caption

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