Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler

White House press secretary Sean Spicer answers reporters' questions during the daily news conference at the White House on Tuesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

White House Spokesman Stumbles Over Assad-Hitler Comparison

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German dictator Adolf Hitler gives a speech in October 1944. Author Norman Ohler says that Hitler's abuse of drugs increased "significantly" from the fall of 1941 until the winter of 1944. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Getty Images

Author Says Hitler Was 'Blitzed' On Cocaine And Opiates During The War

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Adolf Hitler was born in 1889 in an upstairs apartment of this house in the Austrian town of Braunau am Inn, near the border with Germany. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

For Austria, A Tough Choice On What To Do With Hitler's Birthplace

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The new "critical edition" of Mein Kampf, shown here in a Munich bookstore on Friday, is the first version of Adolf Hitler's notorious manifesto to be published in Germany since the end of World War II. Matthias Schrader/AP hide caption

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Matthias Schrader/AP

Hitler's 'Mein Kampf' Is Back In German Bookstores After 70 Years

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel meets with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Berlin on Wednesday. Amos Ben Gershom/Israeli Government Press office/EPA/LandovV hide caption

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Amos Ben Gershom/Israeli Government Press office/EPA/LandovV

Cartoonist Art Spiegelman attends the French Institute Alliance Francaise's "After Charlie: What's Next for Art, Satire and Censorship" at Florence Gould Hall on Feb. 19 in New York City. Mark Sagliocco/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Sagliocco/Getty Images

Graphic Novel About Holocaust 'Maus' Banned In Russia For Its Cover

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Photos of a JC Penney billboard in Culver City, Calif., spurred an online debate over whether the tea kettle resembles German tyrant Adolf Hitler. Imgur, via KPCC hide caption

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Imgur, via KPCC