House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling, shown here at a hearing in March, claims many of the provisions in Dodd-Frank have hurt the economy. Jacquelyn Martin/wld hide caption

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Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray says financial firms use arbitration to "sidestep the legal system [and] avoid accountability." But industry officials say a proposed ban on mandatory arbitration clauses will lead to frivolous legal action. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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New Rule Would Make It Easier For Consumers To Sue Banks

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The JPMorgan Chase headquarters is seen in New York. Sen. Bernie Sanders has said it and other major banks are too big and powerful. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Breaking Up The Banks May Be More Complicated Than It Seems

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A pedestrian walks past the building housing the offices of Mossack Fonseca in Panama City, Panama, on Tuesday. The massive trove of emails, contracts and other papers from the law firm is being called the largest document leak in history. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Progress Made To Rein In Shell Corporations, But More Action Needed

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Neel Kashkari, head of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, says some U.S. banks are still too big. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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He Led The Financial Bailout But Says Banks Are Still Too Big To Fail

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The counterfeit site coolsound.co doesn't say where the company is based. But the source code behind the site reveals tracking cookies from China. coolsound.co / Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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How Major Chinese Banks Help Sell Knock-Offs

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Stonegate Bank's Pompano Beach, Fla., location, shown here, announced it is setting up a correspondent banking relationship with a Cuban financial institution. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Little Florida Bank Goes Where Behemoths Fear To Tread: Cuba

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Mark Patterson, owner of PATCO Construction in Sanford, Maine, said his company lost more than $500,000 to cyberfraud. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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When Cyberfraud Hits Businesses, Banks May Not Offer Protection

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President Obama signs the Dodd-Frank financial overhaul bill in Washington on July 21, 2010. Five years later, debate over the effectiveness of the legislation continues. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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5 Years Later, Legacy Of Financial Overhaul Still Being Weighed

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Pensioners queue outside a national bank branch in Athens on Thursday. Greek banks are running out of cash and the situation poses further danger to the economy, analysts say. Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Debt Crisis Puts The Squeeze On Greece's Banks

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Earlier this year, the European Central Bank, headed by Mario Draghi, launched a bond-buying program to drive down interest rates and boost borrowing. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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When Rates Turn Negative, Banks Pay Customers To Borrow

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Richard Cordray, head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, wants payments to catch up with real-time life. Josep M Suria/iStockphoto hide caption

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Why Slow Electronic Payments Can Cause Cash Flow Problems

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To protect against fraud, U.S. banks will be issuing credit cards with small computer chips. But some experts say using a PIN to complete a transaction is more secure than a signature. iStockphoto hide caption

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U.S. Credit Cards Tackle Fraud With Embedded Chips, But No PINs

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La Roca restaurant in Nogales, Mexico, draws a mix of American tourists and locals. It used to have an American bank account and credit card until the bank closed the account. Jude Joffe-Block/KJZZ hide caption

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Border Businesses Lose Bank Accounts Amid Money-Laundering Fears

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Participants in an ethical hacking contest at a Swiss security conference in Geneva in March. So-called bug bounty programs are becoming very popular in Silicon Valley's high-tech sector. Salvatore Di Nolfi/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Banks Reluctant To Use 'White Hat' Hackers To Spot Security Flaws

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