Five-month-old Ronan Amador rides in a carrier with his mother, Elizabeth Mahoney, during a Planned Parenthood rally on the steps of the Texas Capitol on March 7, 2013, in Austin. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Birth control pills are 99 percent effective in preventing pregnancy, research shows — but only if you remember to take them as prescribed. Rod-shaped implants, T-shaped IUDs and vaginal rings are other options. BSIP/Science Source hide caption

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New York City's health department launched the "Maybe the IUD" campaign this week, aimed at increasing awareness about the IUD as a highly effective and low-maintenance option for birth control. iStock hide caption

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Bayer HealthCare, of Whippany, N.J., brought Essure to market in 2002 as a nonsurgical alternative for women seeking sterilization. Bayer acknowledges the device can lead to complications, but says they are rare. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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The Essure contraceptive device is placed in the fallopian tubes, where it causes scarring that blocks sperm from reaching eggs. Courtesy of Bayer HealthCare hide caption

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When health care providers have the latest information on various birth control methods, research suggests, more of their patients who use birth control choose a long-acting reversible method, like the IUD. iStockphoto hide caption

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University of Notre Dame contends that the act of signing a form opting out of the Affordable Care Act's birth control mandate makes the school complicit in providing coverage. Getty Images hide caption

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Participants sing during a wedding ceremony at Bole Medhane Alem (Savior of the World) Cathedral in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. It's Africa's largest Orthodox church, and its message on contraceptive devices is clear: not permitted. Allison Shelley for NPR hide caption

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"This is the last one," says Yassin Diouf, 40, holding her youngest child. "God help me to stop here." She has given birth 10 times; six of the children have survived. She and her family live in the village of Mereto in Senegal. "Maybe [family planning] is forbidden by Islam, but women are so tired of giving birth. If you have the permission of your husband, I think it's good." Allison Shelley for NPR hide caption

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