Consumer advocates took to the streets of Phoenix recently to protest against an Arizona utility's efforts to bill customers using a so-called "demand charge." If approved, Arizona Public Service would be the first utility in the country to place most of its residential customers on that kind of rate plan. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

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Uber But For Energy: Utility Surge Pricing Threatens Summer Cool

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Construction workers pour concrete at 1 a.m. in Chandler, Ariz. Sarah Ventre/KJZZ hide caption

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When The Going Gets Hot, Construction Workers Get Nocturnal

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The National Weather Service has issued excessive heat warnings, designated in magenta, for parts of several states beginning Saturday and continuing until Tuesday. National Weather Service hide caption

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An Indian farmer sits Tuesday in his dried-up land in Gauribidanur village, in southern India's Karnataka state. More than 750 people have died in a heat wave that has swept across the country. Jagadeesh NV/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Temperatures have reached record highs in Buenos Aires this week. Here, the city's market of Plaza Dorrego in San Telmo is seen on Sunday. Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images hide caption

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The National Weather Service predicts triple-digit temperatures in the Southwest until at least Wednesday. The temperature in Death Valley hit 128 degrees Sunday, a record high for June in the United States. NOAA hide caption

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Excessive heat warnings will continue for much of the Desert Southwest through Monday. Here, Maria Wieser of Italy drinks water while sightseeing in Death Valley National Park on Friday. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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A man stands in a fountain in Washington Square Park on July 18, in New York City. Temperatures were expected in the upper 90's during another heat wave in the city. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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When Heat Kills: Global Warming As Public Health Threat

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John Rohlfing, 38, takes a drink as he works on the construction of his new home Thursday in North Aurora, Ill. He started at 6:00 a.m. and quit at 11:00 a.m. because of triple-digit temperatures. Robert Ray/AP hide caption

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