One teaspoon of pure caffeine powder delivers about the same jolt as 25 cups of coffee. The Center for Science in the Public Interest hide caption

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The Center for Science in the Public Interest

Potent Powdered Caffeine Raises Safety Worries

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A barista makes coffee using the pour-over method at Artifact Coffee in Baltimore. Benjamin Morris/NPR hide caption

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Benjamin Morris/NPR

Coffee Myth-Busting: Cup Of Joe May Help Hydration And Memory

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If Caffeine Can Boost The Memory Of Bees, Can It Help Us, Too?

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The bar at a surprise birthday party for Teen Wolf's Stephen Lunsford, presented by Monster Energy last November in Los Angeles. Todd Williamson/Invision/AP hide caption

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Todd Williamson/Invision/AP

There might be much more caffeine than you think in those supplements you're taking. There also might be much less. Janine Lamontagne/iStockphoto hide caption

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Janine Lamontagne/iStockphoto

The contents of a box of some of the new foods containing caffeine collected by the Center for Science in the Public Interest. Karen Castillo Farfán/NPR hide caption

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Karen Castillo Farfán/NPR

Not Just For Coffee Anymore: The Rise Of Caffeinated Foods

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Sarah Piampiano holds two energy gels, one with caffeine and one without, as she runs in this year's Ironman World Championship. Murray Carpenter for NPR hide caption

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Murray Carpenter for NPR

Caffeine Gives Endurance Athletes A Third And Fourth Wind

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Bring on the caffeine — maybe. antwerpenR/Flickr.com hide caption

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antwerpenR/Flickr.com

Can Coffee Help You Live Longer? We Really Want To Know

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