satellite satellite

An image of Western Hemisphere lightning storms, captured Feb. 14 over the course of one hour. Brighter colors indicate more lightning energy was recorded (the key is in kilowatt-hours of total optical emissions from lightning.) The most powerful storm system is located over the Gulf Coast of Texas. MATLAB/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hide caption

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MATLAB/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

For years, the satellites that make up America's Global Position System have been carrying sensors that measure the weather in space. This image illustrates the orbital planes in which GPS satellites travel around Earth. Courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory hide caption

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Courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory

A composite image of Earth taken at 1:07 p.m. ET on Jan. 15 by the GOES-16 satellite. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hide caption

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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

An artist's depiction of the new GOES-R satellite. Lockheed Martin/Flickr hide caption

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Lockheed Martin/Flickr

New Satellite Provides Weather Forecasts For The Final Frontier

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NASA says this "blue marble" image is the most detailed true-color image of the entire Earth to date. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Satellite Set To Stream Daily Images Of Earth From Space

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Crews work a controlled burn in Geneva, Fla., in December. The state's forest service has rolled out a system to track equipment during fires, and hopes it can eventually be used to pinpoint firefighters, too. Joshua C. Cruey/Courtesy of the Orlando Sentinel hide caption

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Joshua C. Cruey/Courtesy of the Orlando Sentinel

Technology Tracks Crews Through The Fog Of Wildfire

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An artist's rendering of the European Space Agency's GOCE satellite, which is now out of fuel and expected to fall to Earth sometime Sunday or early Monday. European Space Agency/AOES Medialab hide caption

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European Space Agency/AOES Medialab

A rendering of objects currently in Low Earth Orbit (not illustrated to scale). According to NASA, "approximately 95 percent of the objects in this illustration are orbital debris, i.e., not functional satellites." NASA hide caption

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NASA