An artist's conception of how Saturn's immense Phoebe ring might appear to eyes sensitive to infrared wavelengths. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute hide caption

itoggle caption NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Saturn has a rocky surface, but it's deep beneath the clouds. That makes it hard to tell exactly how long the day is. NASA hide caption

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New research suggests that Saturn's tiny moon Enceladus has warm oceans hiding beneath its icy crust. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute hide caption

itoggle caption NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

The Cassini spacecraft has been taking radar images of Titan for years now. This modified image of the Ligeia Mare, a sea on Titan's north pole, is a composite of some of those. NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASI/Cornell hide caption

itoggle caption NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASI/Cornell

The disturbance visible at the outer edge of Saturn's A ring in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft results from gravitational effects on ring particles by an object that may be replaying the birth process of icy moons. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute hide caption

itoggle caption NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

In this rare image taken on July 19, 2013, the wide-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft has captured Saturn's rings and our planet Earth and its moon in the same frame. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute hide caption

itoggle caption NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

That little blue dot is how Earth will likely appear in a photo shot from a spacecraft that is studying Saturn. NASA/JPL-Caltech simulation hide caption

itoggle caption NASA/JPL-Caltech simulation

A mammoth spinning vortex is seen on Saturn, in this "false-color" photograph released by NASA Monday. The image was captured by the Cassini spacecraft. A related image, presenting what a human eye would see, is farther down this page. NASA hide caption

itoggle caption NASA