Manual Cinema/NPR

She Offered The Robber A Glass Of Wine, And That Flipped The Script

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485843453/486854449" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Allan Aarslev, a police superintendent in Aarhus, became part of the effort to make young Muslims feel like they have a future in Denmark. Scanpix Denmark/USAScanpix/Sipa hide caption

toggle caption
Scanpix Denmark/USAScanpix/Sipa
Katherine Streeter for KQED

Frustrated You Can't Find A Therapist? They're Frustrated, Too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/481762357/485982321" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Can You Psych Yourself Into Running A 4-Minute Mile?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482944911/483275253" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tommy Chreene with his horse, Lady, at home in Meaux, La. Chreene spent 26 years working on offshore oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico. While working on the Ursa project, he was part of a program designed to get the workers to open up emotionally with one another. Edmund D. Fountain for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Edmund D. Fountain for NPR

Ron Nielsen, a retired airline pilot, tells his class of fearful fliers in Southern California that crying can be a useful emotional release. If that's what they need to do, he tells them, "let 'er rip!" Courtesy of Air Hollywood hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Air Hollywood

Hollywood Jet Gives Fearful Fliers The Courage To Soar

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478234178/478337200" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
iStock

WOOP, There It Is! 4 Steps To Achieve Your Goals

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477379965/477383054" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Women only got top billing in 37 percent of medical studies published in leading journals over the past two decades. Tom Werner/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Werner/Getty Images

Top Medical Journals Give Women Researchers Short Shrift

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476627522/477382630" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Vacharkulksemsuk et al. /PNAS

To Catch Someone On Tinder, Stretch Your Arms Wide

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472250698/472929246" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Bjorn Rune Lie/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Power Suits: How Dressing For Success At Work Can Pay Off

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/469669877/470925895" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript