Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are seen in a lab at the Fiocruz institute in the Brazilian city of Recife. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Did A Pesticide Cause Microcephaly In Brazil? Unlikely, Say Experts

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Organic farmer Margot McMillen holds a grape leaf damaged by pesticide drift on her farm, Terra Bella Farm, in central Missouri. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Pesticide Drift Threatens Organic Farms

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Using chemicals to control bugs or mold is common among commercial cannabis growers. But with no federal oversight, experts are concerned growers may be using dangerous pesticides. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Concern Grows Over Unregulated Pesticide Use Among Marijuana Growers

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Pam Marrone (right), founder and CEO of Marrone Bio Innovations, inspects some colonies of microbes. Marrone has spent most of her professional life prospecting for microbial pesticides and bringing them to market. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Mighty Farming Microbes: Companies Harness Bacteria To Give Crops A Boost

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A honeybee forages for nectar and pollen from an oilseed rape flower. Albin Andersson/Nature hide caption

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Buzz Over Bee Health: New Pesticide Studies Rev Up Controversy

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Central Illinois corn farmer Jerry McCulley refills his sprayer with the weedkiller glyphosate on a farm near Auburn, Ill. A new assessment of the chemical finds that the (uncertain) risks mainly affect the people who work with it or who come in direct contact with areas where it's applied. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Debate: Should We Genetically Modify Food?

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Corn farmer Jerry McCulley sprays the weedkiller glyphosate across his cornfield in Auburn, Ill., in 2010. An increasing number of weeds have now evolved resistance to the chemical. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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The U.S. Geological Survey found that neonicotinoids are leaching into streams and rivers in the Midwest, including the Missouri River, shown here in Leavenworth, Kan. Dean Bergmann/iStockphoto hide caption

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A Costa Rican banana worker carries a stalk of freshly harvested fruit on a plantation in Costa Rica, where many of the bananas that Americans eat are grown. Kent Gilbert/AP hide caption

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Global Love Of Bananas May Be Hurting Costa Rica's Crocodiles

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A cornfield is shrouded in mist at sunrise in rural Springfield, Neb. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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American Farmers Say They Feed The World, But Do They?

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Farmworkers harvest and package cantaloupes near Firebaugh, Calif. Gosia Wozniacka/AP hide caption

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Beekeepers demonstrate at the EU headquarters in Brussels Monday, as lawmakers vote on whether to ban pesticides blamed for killing bees. Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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