When it comes to biopesticides, one of the most widely used fungi is Beauveria bassiana. Above, a kudzu bug killed by Beauveria bassiana, seen growing out of the cadaver. Courtesy of Brian Lovett/University of Maryland Entomology hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian Lovett/University of Maryland Entomology

Pesticide warning sign in an orange grove. The sign, in English and Spanish, warns that the pesticide chlorpyrifos, or Lorsban, has been applied to these orange trees. Jim West/Science Source hide caption

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Jim West/Science Source

EPA Decides Not To Ban A Pesticide, Despite Its Own Evidence Of Risk

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Beekeepers Glen Andresen and Tim Wessels are trying to breed a honey bee that is more resilient to colder climates. Kathryn Boyd-Batstone/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kathryn Boyd-Batstone/Oregon Public Broadcasting

A central Illinois corn farmer refills his sprayer with the weedkiller glyphosate on a farm near Auburn, Ill. The pesticide has been the subject of intense international scrutiny. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

A farmer sprays a soybean field in Granger, Iowa. There's new and detailed data on the impact of genetically modified crops on pesticide use. Those crops replaced insecticides, and, at first, some herbicides. But herbicide use has rebounded. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Maureen LoCascio, with the mosquito control team in Hudson County, N.J., uses a backpack sprayer to spread insecticide against mosquito larvae. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

To Kill Mosquitoes That Spread Zika, Strike Before They Fly

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A crop duster sprays a field with pesticides. Former USDA scientist Jonathan Lundgren says that he has been persecuted by the agency because his research points out problems with popular pesticides. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

In recent years, a pesticide called flubendiamide has been used on about 14 percent of the nation's almonds, peppers and watermelons. Now the FDA wants to revoke the chemical's conditional approval. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are seen in a lab at the Fiocruz institute in the Brazilian city of Recife. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Did A Pesticide Cause Microcephaly In Brazil? Unlikely, Say Experts

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Organic farmer Margot McMillen holds a grape leaf damaged by pesticide drift on her farm, Terra Bella Farm, in central Missouri. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

Pesticide Drift Threatens Organic Farms

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Using chemicals to control bugs or mold is common among commercial cannabis growers. But with no federal oversight, experts are concerned growers may be using dangerous pesticides. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Concern Grows Over Unregulated Pesticide Use Among Marijuana Growers

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Pam Marrone (right), founder and CEO of Marrone Bio Innovations, inspects some colonies of microbes. Marrone has spent most of her professional life prospecting for microbial pesticides and bringing them to market. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Mighty Farming Microbes: Companies Harness Bacteria To Give Crops A Boost

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