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New York's Guggenheim Museum announced Monday that it was removing three works from its upcoming exhibit of contemporary art from China. Animal rights activists said the works depicted cruelty to animals. Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

A map in Where the Animals Go shows how baboons move near the Mpala Research Centre in Kenya, as tracked by anthropologist Margaret Crofoot and her colleagues in 2012. Margaret Crofoot, University of California, Davis; Damien Farine, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology /Courtesy of Oliver Uberti hide caption

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Margaret Crofoot, University of California, Davis; Damien Farine, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology /Courtesy of Oliver Uberti

Ken Catania of Vanderbilt University lets a small eel zap his arm as he holds a device he designed to measure the strength of the electric current. Ken Catania hide caption

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Ken Catania

It's Like An 'Electric-Fence Sensation,' Says Scientist Who Let An Eel Shock His Arm

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More than 50 Caribbean flamingos take shelter in a men's restroom at the Miami Metrozoo (now Zoo Miami) on Sept. 25, 1998. Zookeepers rounded up the birds to protect them from the effects of Hurricane Georges. This was not the first time the zoo had to corral flamingos in a restroom. They were also in there during Hurricane Andrew, six years earlier. Max Trujillo/Getty Images hide caption

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Max Trujillo/Getty Images

An armed private security team patrols amongst some of John Hume's 1,500 rhinos at Buffalo Dream Ranch, North West Province, South Africa in April 2016. The image is a still from Trophy, directed by Shaul Schwarz and co-directed by Christina Clusiau. Courtesy of Shaul Schwarz/Reel Peak Films. hide caption

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Courtesy of Shaul Schwarz/Reel Peak Films.

Amy Walters from Copperas Cove, Texas, with a horse she rode as she rounded up lost cattle and brought them to the makeshift shelter in Beaumont, Texas. Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio hide caption

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Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio

From Pets To Livestock, Lost Animals Rounded Up In Beaumont's Makeshift Shelter

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During the day on Aug. 21, large swaths of farmland will be plunged into darkness, and temperatures will drop about 10 degrees. Scientists are waiting to see how crops and animals react. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Farmer Wendy Johnson markets hogs, chickens, eggs and seasonal turkeys. She also grows organic row crops at Joia Food Farm near Charles City, Iowa. Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

Rogers hand feeds June, a 300-plus-pound pregnant black bear. Derek Montgomery for NPR hide caption

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Derek Montgomery for NPR

Invisibilia: Should Wild Bears Be Feared Or Befriended?

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A blue whale, the largest animal on the planet, engulfs krill off the coast of California. Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B hide caption

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Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B

How The Biggest Animal On Earth Got So Big

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