Estrogen affects cells in the eye's retina, which may help explain a possible link between glaucoma and estrogen levels. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

The Plan B One-Step morning-after pill will now be available to women as young as 15 without a prescription, and will have another three years of protection from generic competition. AP hide caption

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AP

The federal rules for coverage of birth control by religiously affiliated groups are becoming clear. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Health plans are required to pay for contraceptives, but the clinics that are common sources of family planning services aren't used to dealing with insurers. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York, president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, said the administration's attempted compromise on contraceptive coverage is unacceptable. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Catholic Bishops Reject Compromise On Contraceptives

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Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius joins Democratic senators at a news conference on Capitol Hill on Tuesday to announce new preventive health coverage for women that takes effect Wednesday. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Under Health Law, 'No-Cost' Birth Control Starts Today

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In a compromise, President Obama proposed to allow religious universities and charities offer birth control coverage through their own health insurers. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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President Obama, flanked by Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, announces the revamp of the contraception-care policy on Friday. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

With Contraceptive Coverage Plan 2.0, Obama Pleases Allies, But Not Everyone

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In 2002, state lawmakers in Massachusetts approved legislation requiring most employers to provide contraceptive coverage to their employees. One of the groups pushing for the law was the Coalition for Choice, led by Melissa Kogut (center). Lawrence Jackson/AP hide caption

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Lawrence Jackson/AP

Rules Requiring Contraceptive Coverage Have Been In Force For Years

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