In a compromise, President Obama proposed to allow religious universities and charities offer birth control coverage through their own health insurers. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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President Obama, flanked by Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, announces the revamp of the contraception-care policy on Friday. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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With Contraceptive Coverage Plan 2.0, Obama Pleases Allies, But Not Everyone
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In 2002, state lawmakers in Massachusetts approved legislation requiring most employers to provide contraceptive coverage to their employees. One of the groups pushing for the law was the Coalition for Choice, led by Melissa Kogut (center). Lawrence Jackson/AP hide caption

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Rules Requiring Contraceptive Coverage Have Been In Force For Years
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House Speaker John Boehner says Congress will intervene if President Obama doesn't reconsider a decision to compel church-affiliated employers to cover birth control in their health care plans. Pete Marovich/Getty Images hide caption

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Plan B is available over the counter for people 17 and older. AP hide caption

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The Morning-After Pill: How It Works And Who Uses It
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Many over-the-counter contraceptives contain a spermicide known as nonoxynol-9. Gretchen Cuda Kroen/For NPR hide caption

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What Spermicide Users Should Know, But Often Don't
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Although various types of contraceptive methods are available in Nigeria, about 20 percent of women say they're not able to access them. Sometimes their husbands stand in the way. GEORGE OSODI/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Health insurance plans may soon have to offer prescription contraception at no upfront cost to women. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Medical Panel Recommends No-Cost Birth Control
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Birth Control Without Copays Could Become Mandatory
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