A number of states recently have dedicated more money to educating women and health care providers about the 99 percent effectiveness of long-acting, reversible forms of contraception, like the intrauterine device, or IUD — shown here. Michael Tomsic/WFAE hide caption

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Michael Tomsic/WFAE

Long-Term, Reversible Contraception Gains Traction With Young Women

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Birth control pills are 99 percent effective in preventing pregnancy, research shows — but only if you remember to take them as prescribed. Rod-shaped implants, T-shaped IUDs and vaginal rings are other options. BSIP/Science Source hide caption

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BSIP/Science Source

New York City's health department launched the "Maybe the IUD" campaign this week, aimed at increasing awareness about the IUD as a highly effective and low-maintenance option for birth control. iStock hide caption

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When health care providers have the latest information on various birth control methods, research suggests, more of their patients who use birth control choose a long-acting reversible method, like the IUD. iStockphoto hide caption

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An interauterine device provides long-term birth control. iStockphoto hide caption

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Colorado Debates Whether IUDs Are Contraception Or Abortion

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The ParaGuard IUD, which releases copper into the uterine cavity, can last up to 10 years. In clinical studies, the pregnancy rate among women using the device was less than 1 pregnancy per 100 women annually. Mark Harmel/Science Source hide caption

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Mark Harmel/Science Source