Medical errors rank behind heart disease and cancer as the third leading cause of death in the U.S., Johns Hopkins researchers say. iStockphoto hide caption

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Hear Rachel Martin talk with Dr. Martin Makary
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Employees at all Lowe's home improvement stores, including this one in South San Francisco, Calif., are eligible to have certain surgeries paid for by the company at selected hospitals. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Some Firms Save Money By Offering Employees Free Surgery
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Study Suggests Surgical Residents Can Safely Work Longer Shifts
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Errors in diagnosis, such as inaccuracies or delays in making the information available, account for an estimated 10 percent of patient deaths, a blue-ribbon report says. iStockphoto hide caption

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NYU Langone Medical Center is one of the teaching hospitals being penalized by Medicare for its rate of medical errors. Joshua Bright/AP hide caption

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Advocates for patient safety have had to confront the reality that steps taken to improve the quality of health care can also present opportunities for corruption and conflict of interest. Pascal Fossier/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

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Joe Kiani, addresses the second-annual Patient Safety, Science & Technology Summit in January 2014. Courtesy of the Patient Safety Movement Foundation hide caption

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"We can't continue to have unsafe medical care be a regular part of the way we do business in health care," said Harvard School of Public Health's Dr. Ashish Jha at a Senate hearing Thursday. AP hide caption

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Brian Micalizzi, a pharmacist at Children's Medical Center in Dallas, prepares an antibiotic prescribed to a patient in the emergency department. Juan Pulido/Courtesy of Children's Medical Center hide caption

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Hospitals Put Pharmacists In The ER To Cut Medication Errors
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