A wounded Afghan police officer is helped from the scene of Friday's explosion and gunfire in Kabul. Omar Sobhani /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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The scene Thursday in Kabul, Afghanistan, after a suicide bomber attacked a NATO convoy. Zhao Yishen /Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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A man grieves as others try to help victims and remove bodies from the scene in Kabul earlier today (Dec. 6, 2011) after a suicide bomb exploded in a crowd of Shiite worshipers. Massoud Hossaini /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way

Suicide Bomber Attacks Kabul Shrine, Dozens Dead

About 50 people were killed in Kabul and another four in Mazar-i-Sharif. The attacks were apparently aimed at minority Shiites who were gathered for a religious festival.

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Afghan Security personnel stand above the body of one attacker, on the 10th floor of the building in Kabul from which RPGs and other weapons were fired. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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The Inter-Continental hotel in seen in the dark as tracer bullets are shot during an attack in Kabul. Massoud Hossaini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way

Attackers Storm Hotel In Afghanistan's Capital

The Inter-Continental, once part of an international chain, is one of the Afghan capital's more luxurious hotels. No word yet on any casualties.

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