Many people like these Tibetans in Qinghai, China, rely on indoor stoves for heating and cooking. That causes serious health problems. Courtesy of One Earth Designs hide caption

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Police were checking cars throughout Paris on Monday, including near the Arc de Triomphe, as the city tried to cut air pollution by instituting odd-even driving restrictions. Philippe Wojazer /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Headlamps make cold nights cozier, but leave the fuel-burning lanterns and stoves outside. Gopal Vijayaraghavan/Flickr hide caption

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Skyscrapers are obscured by heavy haze in Beijing on Jan. 13. Air pollution remains a serious — sometimes overwhelming — problem, but researchers say environmental technology is available to solve it. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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China's Air Pollution: Is The Government Willing To Act?
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Men walk along a railway line in Beijing on Jan. 12, as air pollution reached hazardous levels. Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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China's Air Pollution Linked To Millions Of Early Deaths
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