Greenland native Nina-Vivi Andersen, pictured in downtown Nuuk, Greenland, has her own perspective on the word Eskimo: "I don't mind to be called Eskimo — it is neutral for me. But when I saw an ice cream store in London with a name — Eskimo — it felt weird. But I feel weird to be called Inuit, too. I'm just a Greenlander." John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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A small island sits in the middle of Kangeq's old harbor. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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The Arctic Suicides: It's Not The Dark That Kills You
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Nuuk, Greenland's capital, hosted about 2,000 people for this year's Arctic Winter Games. It was the biggest event ever held in Greenland. Rebecca Hersher/NPR hide caption

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At Arctic Winter Games, Biathlons, Stick Pulls And Sledge Jumps
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The Northern Lights over the town of Ittoqqortoormiit, Greenland — about 400 miles north of the Arctic Circle. Rebecca Hersher/NPR hide caption

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In The Arctic Circle, The Sun Will Come Up After 58 Tomorrows
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A lone polar bear poses on a block of arctic sea ice in Russia's Franz Josef Land. iStockphoto hide caption

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Arctic Is Warming Twice As Fast As World Average
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A new study suggests the Greenland Ice Sheet did not fully melt during previous periods of global warming — and that it preserved a tundra beneath it. Joshua Brown/ University of Vermont hide caption

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Workers stand inside the gold mine in Greenland's Nulanaq mountain in 2009. The Danish territory's underground wealth was at the forefront of elections in March. Now, Greenland faces another dilemma: whether to end a zero-tolerance policy on uranium extraction. Adrian Joachim/AP hide caption

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As Greenland Seeks Economic Development, Is Uranium The Way?
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