The Lone Star tick, common to the southeastern U.S., is responsible for inducing meat allergies in some people, scientists say. CDC Public Health Image Library hide caption

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Last year, Tom Mather caught 15,000 deer ticks in the woods of southern Rhode Island. "People really need to become tick literate," the University of Rhode Island researcher says. Brian Mullen for NPR hide caption

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To Fight Tick-Borne Disease, Someone Has To Catch Ticks

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Lyme disease is spread by deer ticks like this one. A study finds that some people can be reinfected many times with the bacteria that cause the disease. Lauree Feldman/Getty Creative Images hide caption

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Recurring Lyme Disease Rash Caused By Reinfection, Not Relapse

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