South Sudan South Sudan

Some of the more than 30,000 Nuer civilians sheltering in a United Nations base in South Sudan's capital Juba for fear of targeted killings by government forces walk by an armored vehicle and a watchtower manned by Chinese peacekeepers. Jason Patinkin/AP hide caption

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Jason Patinkin/AP

Black smoke rises above Juba, the capital of South Sudan, on Sunday. Explosions and heavy weapons gunfire are shaking Juba Monday in the fifth day of clashes between government and opposition forces, raising the specter of a return to civil war. Iain McLellan/AP hide caption

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Iain McLellan/AP

The mystery disease in South Sudan has not been identified but is known to cause fever and unexplained bleeding. Above: an image of another hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, made with an electron microscope and then colorized. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

Morning at the MSF hospital compound in Bentiu, South Sudan. The two doctors, Jiske Steensma (left) and Navpreet Sahsi, sit in front of the tents that serve as living quarters for the international workers during their three-to-six-month stints. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Five Days And Five Nights With Doctors Without Borders

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A child in South Sudan studies in a school. Fewer than half of the school-age kids are in school in South Sudan, one of the world's poorest countries, which has also been plagued by war. Sebastian Rich/UNICEF South Sudan hide caption

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Sebastian Rich/UNICEF South Sudan

Hundreds of thousands of South Sudanese have fled their homes because of the ongoing civil war. (Above) Kids at a displaced persons camp in Bentiu. Many of the residents came from the part of South Sudan where the shipping container massacre reportedly occurred. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Children stand on top of an earthen dam in the camp in Bentiu. Massive dams, drainage canals and water retention pools were constructed after the camp flooded repeatedly during the rainy season. Residents say the water and mud was so deep in their huts that they had to sleep sitting up in chairs. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Nothing Is Going Right In The World's Newest Nation

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The town of Bentiu, in South Sudan, has been nearly abandoned. On the main road, a boy hides behind a telephone pole. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Living In A Camp By A Ruined City, They're Strangers In Their Own Land

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South Sudanese civilians flee fighting in the northeastern town of Malakal on February 18, 2016, where gunmen opened fire on civilians sheltering inside a United Nations base. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images