Morning at the MSF hospital compound in Bentiu, South Sudan. The two doctors, Jiske Steemsna (left) and Navpreet Sahsi, sit in front of the tents that serve as living quarters for the international workers during their three-to-six-month stints. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Embedded Podcast: The 'High Highs' And 'Deep Lows' At A Doctors Without Borders Hospital
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A child in South Sudan studies in a school. Fewer than half of the school-age kids are in school in South Sudan, one of the world's poorest countries, which has also been plagued by war. Sebastian Rich/UNICEF South Sudan hide caption

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Hundreds of thousands of South Sudanese have fled their homes because of the ongoing civil war. (Above) Kids at a displaced persons camp in Bentiu. Many of the residents came from the part of South Sudan where the shipping container massacre reportedly occurred. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Children stand on top of an earthen dam in the camp in Bentiu. Massive dams, drainage canals and water retention pools were constructed after the camp flooded repeatedly during the rainy season. Residents say the water and mud was so deep in their huts that they had to sleep sitting up in chairs. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Nothing Is Going Right In The World's Newest Nation
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The town of Bentiu, in South Sudan, has been nearly abandoned. On the main road, a boy hides behind a telephone pole. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Living In A Camp By A Ruined City, They're Strangers In Their Own Land
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South Sudanese civilians flee fighting in the northeastern town of Malakal on February 18, 2016, where gunmen opened fire on civilians sheltering inside a United Nations base. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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South Sudanese seeking refuge line up to register at the U.N.'s base in Bentiu in February. At that time, the camp was receiving up to 200 new people a day. It now serves as home to some 100,000 people. Charles Lomodong/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.N. Bases Turn Into Cities For Desperate And Displaced In South Sudan
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Calling relatives they hadn't spoken to since 2013: from left to right, Chol Lul Walou, approximately 60, called her daughter and son-in-law; Simon Lam Yiek, 33, called his brother; Nyanchan Maluol Mot, 19, called her sister. Giles Duley/Courtesy of ICRC hide caption

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They Haven't Spoken To Family In Years. Now They Get A 3-Minute Call
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President Obama and his delegation stand Monday during a welcome ceremony with Ethiopia's Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn at the National Palace in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Tiksa Negeri /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Daniel Majook Gai from South Sudan goes in and out of his war-torn country to help children there go to school. Courtesy of Project Education South Sudan hide caption

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A 'Lost Boy' Helps The Girls Of South Sudan Find An Education
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A picture taken with a smart phone shows Syrian refugees queuing at one of the many UNHCR (United Nations Refugee Agency) registration centers in Lebanon. At the same time that civil wars and the Ebola outbreak are plaguing countries in Africa, Syrian and Iraqi refugees are seeking help from agencies. Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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World's Aid Agencies Stretched To Their Limits By Simultaneous Crises
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South Sudan's President Salva Kiir (left) and rebel leader Riek Machar (right) shake hands and pray before signing an agreement of the cease-fire of the South Sudan conflict on Friday in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Elias Asmare/AP hide caption

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