Michael Arnott, of Cambridge, Mass., says he used to have trouble staying awake on long drives. Sleep specialists discovered he has obstructive sleep apnea, though not for the most common reasons — he isn't overweight, and doesn't smoke or take sedatives. M. Scott Brauer for NPR hide caption

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Snooze Alert: A Sleep Disorder May Be Harming Your Body And Brain
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CPAP masks have become much more comfortable than in years past, doctors say. But most of the time, they're probably not the first thing to try for sleep apnea. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Dr. David Gross, medical director of the sleep lab at the National Rehabilitation Hospital in Washington, D.C., says more than three-quarters of the patients who come to his lab are diagnosed with apnea. Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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The Sleep Apnea Business Is Booming, And Insurers Aren't Happy
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Many people with sleep apnea wear a CPAP machine mask in bed to help them breathe. Amy Walters/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Sleep Apnea Makes Quick Comeback When Breathing Treatment Stops
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