David Fuller has been a dairy farmer since 1977. He gets about the same amount of money for milk these days he did when he started. Rebecca Sananes/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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Rebecca Sananes/Vermont Public Radio

Companies are selling "milk" derived from a wide variety of plants. The dairy industry isn't happy about it. Bob Chamberlin/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Bob Chamberlin/LA Times via Getty Images

Soy, Almond, Coconut: If It's Not From A Cow, Can You Legally Call It Milk?

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To protest against the falling prices of dairy and meat, farmers pour liters of milk in front of a prefecture in northwestern France in January. Jean-Francois Monier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jean-Francois Monier/AFP/Getty Images

There's a growing body of evidence challenging the notion that low-fat dairy is best. Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Full-Fat Paradox: Dairy Fat Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

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Mary Lou Wesselhoeft is a dairy farmer in the Florida Panhandle. Her Ocheesee Creamery pasteurized skim milk has nothing added — and that's the problem. According to regulations, without added vitamins, it can only be sold as "imitation skim milk." Courtesy of Institute for Justice hide caption

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Courtesy of Institute for Justice

Holstein cows at Homestead Dairy in Plymouth, Ind. Mira Oberman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mira Oberman/AFP/Getty Images

Gigi The Cow Broke The Milk Production Record. Is That Bad For Cows?

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Near the Danish city of Ikast, some 1,500 spectators gathered on April 19 to celebrate what has become something of a national holiday at organic dairy farms around Denmark. Courtesy of Organic Denmark hide caption

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Courtesy of Organic Denmark

Cows rotate in the milking parlor at Fair Oaks Farms, a large-scale dairy and tourist attraction, near Rensselaer, Ind. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Inside The Indiana Megadairy Making Coca-Cola's New Milk

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The milk's industry's new campaign, Milk Life, features ordinary people accomplishing all sorts of tasks after jumpstarting their day with a glass of milk. Courtesy of Milk Processor Education Program hide caption

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Courtesy of Milk Processor Education Program