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Pastoral Medicine Credentials Raise Questions In Texas

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Dr. Alexis LaPietra (left) and Dr. Mark Rosenberg have developed a program that tries to treat emergency room patients' pain without using opioids, which pose fatal risks. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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No Joke: N.J. Hospital Uses Laughing Gas To Cut Down On Opioid Use

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A December celebration launching a partnership between members of the Garifuna community and a doctor in New York. The collaboration is aimed at reducing the HIV infection rate among the Garifuna. Alexandra Starr/NPR hide caption

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An Unlikely Alliance Fights HIV In The Bronx's Afro-Honduran Diaspora

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Ads often tout dietary supplements and vitamins as "natural" remedies. But studies show megadoses of some vitamins can actually boost the risk of heart disease and cancer, warns Dr. Paul Offit. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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The trade in dried geckos, such as these from Indonesia, is on the rise amid growing demand for their use as an ingredient in medicinal and skin care products in Asia. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images hide caption

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