Sen. Mark Warner Sen. Mark Warner

Sens. Mark Warner, D-Va., and Richard Burr, R-N.C., lead the Senate Intelligence Committee, which is investigating Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. Tasos Katopodis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/AFP/Getty Images

Mark Warner (from left) of Virginia, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, and Republican Chairman Richard Burr of North Carolina listen to testimony during a March 30 hearing in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Sen. Mark Warner: No Evidence To Support Trump's Political Snooping Claims

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Senate Select Intelligence Committee Chairman Sen. Richard Burr, right, confers with ranking member Sen. Mark Warner, left, during a hearing of the Senate Select Intelligence Committee Thursday in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Director of the National Intelligence James Clapper, seated at the table meets with the Senate Intelligence Committee Feb. 9, including Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C. Burr and the committee's minority leader, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., are working on a bill that would force companies like Apple to help prosecutors unlock the phones of criminal suspects. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

In Apple-FBI Fight, Congress Considers Aggressive And Measured Approaches

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Senators Warner and Chambliss

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