Male treehoppers make their abdomens thrum like tuning forks to transmit very particular vibrating signals that travel down their legs and along leaf stems to other bugs — male and female. Courtesy of Robert Oelman hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Robert Oelman

The tarantula hawk, undoubtedly eyeing its next hapless eight-legged prey. Fred Holley/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption Fred Holley/Flickr

Brooke Borel says bedbugs were essentially wiped out after World War II thanks to DDT. It's not totally clear why they came back in the past couple of decades. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

N. gardneri mushrooms grow at the base of young babassu palms in Brazil. A bland tan by day, the fungi emit an eerie green light by night. Michele P. Verderane/IP-USP hide caption

toggle caption Michele P. Verderane/IP-USP

Science

Why Some Mushrooms Glow In The Dark

Scientists outfitted some fake fungi with LEDs and put them in a Brazilian forest to test their theory that light, not some funky mushroom fragrance, was luring bugs.

Listen Loading… 2:34
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/394089178/394438291" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A scorpion fly perches on a leaf at the research farm where Lindgren studied the decomposition of human remains. Scorpion flies are among the first insects to visit a corpse. Courtesy of Natalie Lindgren hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Natalie Lindgren

Unless there's a serious pileup, ants in traffic tend to bypass a collision and just keep going. A physicist has found a way to model this behavior with a mathematical equation. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

An earlier spring in Montana's Glacier National Park means full waterfalls at first — but much drier summers. Robert Glusic/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption Robert Glusic/Corbis

Made for a tight grip: The female penis of an insect species newly discovered in Brazil has spines on it. Courtesy of Current Biology, Yoshizawa et al. hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Current Biology, Yoshizawa et al.

Gordon recommends dusting the deep-fried tarantula spider with smoked paprika. Chugrad McAndrews/Reprinted with permission from The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook hide caption

toggle caption Chugrad McAndrews/Reprinted with permission from The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook

Cicada: It's what's for dinner? Sean Bush/AP hide caption

toggle caption Sean Bush/AP

NPR thanks our sponsors

Become an NPR sponsor