The underwater construction skills of the caddis fly larva have caught the interest of bioengineers. The larva tapes and glues pebbles together to form a sturdy protective case. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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Garden centipede (Lithobius forficatus), Lithobiidae, German cockroach (Blattela germanica), Blatellidae, Garden tiger moth (Arctia caja). Artwork by Dale Edna Evans. De Agostini Picture Library/De Agostini/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, shown wearing one of her trademark collars in 2010, now has an insect named in her honor. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Maureen LoCascio, with the mosquito control team in Hudson County, N.J., uses a backpack sprayer to spread insecticide against mosquito larvae. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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To Kill Mosquitoes That Spread Zika, Strike Before They Fly

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Green when young, and about the size of an adult human's hand when full-grown, Dryococelus australis is more commonly known as the Lord Howe Island stick insect, or the tree lobster. Courtesy of Rohan Cleave/Melbourne Zoo hide caption

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Love Giant Insects? Meet The Tree Lobster, Back From The Brink

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Male treehoppers make their abdomens thrum like tuning forks to transmit very particular vibrating signals that travel down their legs and along leaf stems to other bugs — male and female. Courtesy of Robert Oelman hide caption

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Good Vibrations Key To Insect Communication

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The tarantula hawk, undoubtedly eyeing its next hapless eight-legged prey. Fred Holley/Flickr hide caption

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For This Tarantula-Killing Wasp, Dinner's A Meal Best Served Living

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Brooke Borel says bedbugs were essentially wiped out after World War II thanks to DDT. It's not totally clear why they came back in the past couple of decades. iStockphoto hide caption

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The Creepy, Crawly World Of Bedbugs And How They Have 'Infested' Homes

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N. gardneri mushrooms grow at the base of young babassu palms in Brazil. A bland tan by day, the fungi emit an eerie green light by night. Michele P. Verderane/IP-USP hide caption

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Why Some Mushrooms Glow In The Dark

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A scorpion fly perches on a leaf at the research farm where Lindgren studied the decomposition of human remains. Scorpion flies are among the first insects to visit a corpse. Courtesy of Natalie Lindgren hide caption

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Unless there's a serious pileup, ants in traffic tend to bypass a collision and just keep going. A physicist has found a way to model this behavior with a mathematical equation. iStockphoto hide caption

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Why Ants Handle Traffic Better Than You Do

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An earlier spring in Montana's Glacier National Park means full waterfalls at first — but much drier summers. Robert Glusic/Corbis hide caption

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There's A Big Leak In America's Water Tower

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