At the Iowa State University Beef Nutrition Farm, the cattle eat carefully formulated rations. Researchers there are trying to test new types of animal feed. Amy Mayer/Iowa Public Radio hide caption

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Amy Mayer/Iowa Public Radio

Beef carcasses hang in the sales cooler at the JBS beef plant in Greeley, Colo. Stephanie Paige Ogburn/KUNC hide caption

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Stephanie Paige Ogburn/KUNC

Inside The World's Largest Food Company You've Probably Never Heard Of

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Gayland Regier carries buckets of feed to his cattle in southeast Nebraska. Imported cattle make up a small portion of the American beef supply, but many American farmers and ranchers are concerned that foreign-sourced meat could distort their markets. courtesy of Grant Gerlock/NET News/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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courtesy of Grant Gerlock/NET News/Harvest Public Media

The Cornucopia Institute commissioned this photo of an organic egg producer in Saranac, Mich. According to Cornucopia, the facility is owned by Herbruck's Poultry Ranch, which has a license to maintain up to 1 million chickens on this site. Courtesy of The Cornucopia Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of The Cornucopia Institute

Free-range chickens stand in a pen at an organic-accredited poultry farm in Germany. Joern Pollex/Getty Images hide caption

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Joern Pollex/Getty Images

Chicken Confidential: How This Bird Came To Rule The Cultural Roost

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The turkeys at Kate Stillman's farm don't have to be loaded on a trailer and driven hundreds of miles this year. They now meet their ends on the same farm where they lived their lives. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Chris Arnold/NPR

For More Local Turkeys To Hit Holiday Tables, You Need An Abattoir

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Researchers say there's plenty the beef industry can do to use less land and water and emit fewer greenhouse gas emissions. But producers may need to charge a premium to make those changes. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

The rendering industry likes to call itself the world's oldest recycling system. Nearly 100 percent of processed pigs will eventually get used — as meat and in uses as varied as medicine and pet food. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Although the FDA seems to have backed off, farmers and brewers are still nervous about the FDA's rule, which will be proposed again at the end of summer. Shelly Pope/KQED hide caption

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Shelly Pope/KQED

Fox Ranch, outside Yuma County, Colo., is a 14,000-acre nature preserve and working cattle ranch owned by The Nature Conservancy. The ranch is an experiment in planned grazing, which aims to improve soil health and help ranchers' bottom lines. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Rancher Denny Johnson looks over his cattle in Joseph, Ore., in 2011. Conservationists say ranchers raising beef cattle are responsible for the decline of some wildlife. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Young broilers nibble feed at a chicken farm in Luling, Texas. The Food and Drug Administration has issued new guidance on how drug companies label antibiotics for livestock. Bob Nichols/USDA/Flickr hide caption

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Bob Nichols/USDA/Flickr

Drug Companies Accept FDA Plan To Phase Out Some Animal Antibiotic Uses

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Russ Kremer with some of his hogs on his farm in Frankenstein, Mo., in 2009. Instead of buying conventional feed, Kremer grazes his hogs in a pasture, and grows grains and legumes for them. Jeff Roberson /AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson /AP

A truckload of live turkeys arrives at a Cargill plant in Springdale, Ark., in 2011. Most turkeys in the U.S. are regularly given low doses of antibiotics. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Danny Johnston/AP

Antibiotic-Resistant Bugs Turn Up Again In Turkey Meat

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Cows wait to be milked at a California dairy farm. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Only Luxembourgers eat more meat per person than Americans. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

A Nation Of Meat Eaters: See How It All Adds Up

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Men at a slaughterhouse stand near hanging beef carcasses, late 1940s. Lass/Getty Images hide caption

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Lass/Getty Images

The Making Of Meat-Eating America

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