Young broilers nibble feed at a chicken farm in Luling, Texas. The Food and Drug Administration has issued new guidance on how drug companies label antibiotics for livestock. Bob Nichols/USDA/Flickr hide caption

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Bob Nichols/USDA/Flickr

Drug Companies Accept FDA Plan To Phase Out Some Animal Antibiotic Uses

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Russ Kremer with some of his hogs on his farm in Frankenstein, Mo., in 2009. Instead of buying conventional feed, Kremer grazes his hogs in a pasture, and grows grains and legumes for them. Jeff Roberson /AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson /AP

A truckload of live turkeys arrives at a Cargill plant in Springdale, Ark., in 2011. Most turkeys in the U.S. are regularly given low doses of antibiotics. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Danny Johnston/AP

Antibiotic-Resistant Bugs Turn Up Again In Turkey Meat

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Cows wait to be milked at a California dairy farm. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Only Luxembourgers eat more meat per person than Americans. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

A Nation Of Meat Eaters: See How It All Adds Up

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Men at a slaughterhouse stand near hanging beef carcasses, late 1940s. Lass/Getty Images hide caption

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Lass/Getty Images

The Making Of Meat-Eating America

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The FDA's latest effort to end the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in animals is getting mixed reviews from activists. Rob Carr/AP hide caption

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Rob Carr/AP

FDA Launches Voluntary Plan To Reduce Use Of Antibiotics In Animals

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Pigs take a mud bath at the De Jofrahoeve pig farm in Esch, Netherlands. Dutch farmers treat their animals with almost three times the antibiotics that their Danish neighbors use. Robin Utrecht/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robin Utrecht/AFP/Getty Images

Breeding sows in crates at a subsidiary of Smithfield Foods in 2010. The photo was shot by the Humane Society as part of an undercover investigation. Humane Society/Associated Press hide caption

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Humane Society/Associated Press

Many livestock groups say there's no evidence that antibiotics in livestock feed have caused a human health problem, but researchers beg to differ. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images