A mountain of mine tailings frame a Bisbee park — a legacy of the copper mines that once fueled the local economy. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Doctor Shortage In Rural Arizona Sparks Another Crisis In 'Forgotten America'

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"We should be around the world. But we should also be focused on our own backyards," Microsoft President Brad Smith says. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Microsoft Courts Rural America, And Politicians, With High-Speed Internet

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Greta Elliott, who manages a health clinic in Canby, Calif., says she didn't buy health insurance for herself because she thinks it's too expensive. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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In A Conservative Corner Of California, A Push To Preserve Obamacare

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Volunteers distribute free food at the mobile pantry in Hurley, Va. Poverty in the coal-mining region is 29 percent, twice the national average. Unemployment is also high, and younger families are moving out. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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In Some Rural Counties, Hunger Is Rising, But Food Donations Aren't

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Dr. Adam McMahan has been practicing medicine in rural Alaska for three years. It's the kind of intimate, full-spectrum family medicine the 34-year-old doctor loves. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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In Rural Alaska, A Young Doctor Walks To His Patient's Bedside

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Shelia Mendoza says she's not looking for a livelihood out of Liberty Mobility, but a little extra cash and some new friends to talk to. M.L. Schultze/WKSU hide caption

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Ride Hailing In Rural America: Like Uber With A Neighborly Feel

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A new water tank in Strong City, Kan., (at right) sits next to one that was part of an old leaky system on a hill just outside the city limits. Frank Morris/KCUR hide caption

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Rural Trump Voters Embrace The Sacrifices That Come With Support

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Cairo has lost more than half of its population in recent decades. Today, there are just under 3,000 people left. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Tired Of Promises, A Struggling Small Town Wants Problems Solved

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Darvin Bentlage is a fourth-generation farmer from Golden City, Mo. He was uninsured before the ACA and featured in a video from the Department of Health and Human Services supporting the law. Screenshot/Department of Health and Human Services hide caption

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Medical Bills Once Made Him Refinance The Farm. Could It Happen Again?

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Coeur d'Alene is the largest city and county seat of Kootenai County, Idaho. North Idaho counties like Kootenai have seen their population double since the 1990s. Karen Ybanez/Flickr hide caption

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Leaving Urban Areas For The Political Homogeneity Of Rural Towns

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During the 2016 presidential election, many rural communities supported and voted for then-candidate Donald Trump. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

Rural America Supported Trump, But Will His Policies Support Them?

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Brothers Tim (left) and Bill (right) Jackson have been watching the initial moves of the Trump administration with different views. Brian Mann for NPR hide caption

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As Protests Emerge, Brothers Agree To Give Trump Administration A Chance

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Who speaks for rural America? Farmers want international trade deals and relief from regulations. But small towns are focused on re-inventing themselves to attract a new generation. FrankvandenBergh/Getty Images hide caption

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Farmers Are Courting Trump, But They Don't Speak For All Of Rural America

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Susan Frawley Eisele holds her 6-week-old son, Albert Jr., at the Waldorf Astoria hotel in New York City in 1936. Eisele, of Blue Earth, Minn., won an essay contest with Country Home magazine and was named best American rural correspondent of 1936. Courtesy of Kitty Eisele hide caption

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Courtesy of Kitty Eisele

When Mrs. Eisele Took Manhattan: Big City Failed To Awe Minnesota Journalist

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