A gunman's appearance at a Washington, D.C., pizzeria that was falsely reported to house a pedophilia ring has elevated worries over the unrelenting rise of fake news on the Internet. Nicholas Kamm /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm /AFP/Getty Images

What Legal Recourse Do Victims Of Fake News Stories Have?

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The University of Chicago informed incoming students in a welcome letter it does not support "trigger warnings" or "safe spaces," as part of its policy of free speech. Ralf-Finn Hestoft/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Ralf-Finn Hestoft/Corbis via Getty Images

University Of Chicago Tells Freshmen It Does Not Support 'Trigger Warnings'

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At a 2015 press conference with President Obama in Addis Ababa, Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn asked the foreign press corps to "help our journalists to increase their capacity." Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Freed From Prison, Ethiopian Bloggers Still Can't Leave The Country

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Holograms of human figures are displayed during a "ghost protest" against South Korea's president in front of the Gyeongbok Palace in Seoul on Wednesday. Amnesty International in Korea said it decided to use the holograms after protesters were denied permission to march. See the video below. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

Indian activists from the student wing of Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party protest near the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi on May 25, 2010, against Wendy Doniger's The Hindus. Penguin Books, India, said this week that it would withdraw the book and pulp it. Anindito Mukherjee/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Anindito Mukherjee/EPA/Landov

Author Of Book Yanked In India Says Move Has Backfired

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