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Investors See Big Opportunities In Opioid Addiction Treatment

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The Probuphine implant delivers medication for six months. It helps reduce cravings for people with opioid use disorder. Courtesy of Braeburn Pharmaceuticals hide caption

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Long-Acting Opioid Treatment Could Be Available In A Month

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A man in Mount Airy, Md., shakes Suboxone pills from a bottle in late March. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Treating Opioid Addiction With A Drug Raises Hope And Controversy

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We Found Joy: An Addict Struggles To Get Treatment

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Stacey McHoul said she ran out of psychiatric medicine a few days after leaving jail last year and soon began using heroin again. Courtesy of Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Opana pills, seen in 2010, before Endo Pharmaceuticals changed the formula in a move intended to deter abuse. Tom Walker/Flickr hide caption

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How A Painkiller Designed To Deter Abuse Helped Spark An HIV Outbreak

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"Everyone that's in there right now has probably done it," Clyde Polly says about Opana injections at his home. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

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Inside A Small Brick House At The Heart Of Indiana's Opioid Crisis

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A Crisis With Scant Data: States Move To Count Drug-Dependent Babies

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Amanda Hensley with her daughter, Valencia. Hensley says several hospitals and clinics she contacted were reluctant to help her quit her opioid habit. "Nobody wants to touch a pregnant woman with an addiction issue." Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Pregnant And Addicted: The Tough Road To Family Health

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Doctors are trying to slowly wean Lexi from her dependence on methadone. She's just 2 weeks old. Under a doctor's advice, her mom took methadone while pregnant, to help kick a heroin habit. Kristin Espeland Gourlay/RIPR hide caption

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Tiny Opioid Patients Need Help Easing Into Life

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An Addict, Now Clean, Discusses Needle Exchanges And 'Hope After Heroin'

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Dr. Jessie Gaeta, chief medical officer of Health Care for the Homeless at Boston Medical Center, stands in a conference room that will soon be converted to a place where patients high on heroin or other drugs can be safely monitored. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Boston's Heroin Users Will Soon Get A Safer Place To Be High

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"The people that I know who have lost spouses, children, some of them are so ashamed that they wouldn't even acknowledge it as a cause of death," says A. Thomas McLellan, co-founder of the Treatment Research Institute. Courtesy of Treatment Research Institute hide caption

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Treating Addiction As A Chronic Disease

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Can Baltimore Provide Addiction Treatment On Demand?

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Shortage Of Addiction Counselors Further Strained By Opioid Epidemic

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A long vacant and blighted property was torn down in northwest Rutland this past year. The Rotary Club and other volunteers plan to erect a playground on the property as part of an effort to reclaim a neighborhood hard hit by drugs and crime. Nina Keck/VPR hide caption

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Tragedy Moves A Community To Combat Drug Addiction

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A pharmacist counts pain pills. In an effort to curb the abuse of Oxycontin, Vicodin and other opioid painkillers, some health plans in Massachusetts now limit a patient's initial prescription to a 15-day supply, and plan to halve that number in February. Gabe Souza/Getty Images hide caption

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Insurers Hire Social Workers To Tackle The Opioid Epidemic

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The effects of opioid abuse can go unnoticed at work. George Doyle/Getty Images hide caption

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Opioid Abuse Takes A Toll On Workers And Their Employers

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