Addiction to opioids and heroin is a major public health problem, but so is alcohol abuse. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

Surgeon General Murthy Wants America To Face Up To Addiction

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After a string of inpatient rehabilitation stays, Louis Casanova, who lives near Philadelphia, says he is still trying to break his addiction. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

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Ben Allen/WITF

How We Got Here: Treating Addiction In 28 Days

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Public health officials want doctors to consider treating alcohol abuse with medications that have a track record of success. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Health care providers have to have permission from the federal government to provide medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

Lisa Olson, of Mesa, Ariz., uses marijuana to ease the symptoms of multiple sclerosis. Stina Sieg/KJZZ hide caption

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Stina Sieg/KJZZ

Marijuana's Mainstream Move Triggers Different Kinds Of Family Talks

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Nicole Xu for NPR

A Small Town Struggles With A Boom In Sober Living Homes

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Taylor Callery/Ikon Images/Getty Images

'Unbroken Brain' Explains Why 'Tough' Treatment Doesn't Help Drug Addicts

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As many as 70,000 more people could get access to office-based treatment for opioid use now that the administration has raised the cap on the number of patients each doctor is allowed to treat. Jamie Grill/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan McHugh/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Investors See Big Opportunities In Opioid Addiction Treatment

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The Probuphine implant delivers medication for six months. It helps reduce cravings for people with opioid use disorder. Courtesy of Braeburn Pharmaceuticals hide caption

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Courtesy of Braeburn Pharmaceuticals

Long-Acting Opioid Treatment Could Be Available In A Month

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A man in Mount Airy, Md., shakes Suboxone pills from a bottle in late March. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Treating Opioid Addiction With A Drug Raises Hope And Controversy

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Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

We Found Joy: An Addict Struggles To Get Treatment

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Stacey McHoul said she ran out of psychiatric medicine a few days after leaving jail last year and soon began using heroin again. Courtesy of Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Courtesy of Kaiser Health News

Opana pills, seen in 2010, before Endo Pharmaceuticals changed the formula in a move intended to deter abuse. Tom Walker/Flickr hide caption

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Tom Walker/Flickr

How A Painkiller Designed To Deter Abuse Helped Spark An HIV Outbreak

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"Everyone that's in there right now has probably done it," Clyde Polly says about Opana injections at his home. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

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Seth Herald for NPR

Inside A Small Brick House At The Heart Of Indiana's Opioid Crisis

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