Charlene Yurgaitis gets health insurance through Medicaid in Pennsylvania. It covers the counseling and medication she and her doctors say she needs to recover from her opioid addiction. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

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GOP's Proposed Cuts To Medicaid Threaten Treatment For Opioid Addiction

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With an opioid addiction crisis that shows no sign of abating, how we describe addiction and dependence matters. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Charmayne Healy (left) and Miranda Kirk (right), co-founders of the Aaniiih Nakoda Anti-Drug Movement, have helped Melinda Healy (center) with their peer-support programs. Nora Saks/MTPR hide caption

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2 Sisters Try To Tackle Drug Use At A Montana Indian Reservation

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Mark Fiore for KQED

Is 'Internet Addiction' Real?

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Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price contradicted his agency's online information about the efficacy of medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. James Baker holds a photo of his son, Max, who had been sober for more than a year and was in college when he relapsed after surgery and died of a heroin overdose. Craig LeMoult/WGBH hide caption

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Craig LeMoult/WGBH

How Do Former Opioid Addicts Safely Get Pain Relief After Surgery?

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Hannah Berkowitz in her parents' home in West Hartford, Conn. Getting intensive in-home drug treatment is what ultimately helped her get back on track, she and her mom agree. Jack Rodolico/NHPR hide caption

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Home-Based Drug Treatment Program Costs Less And Works

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Christopher Milford in his apartment in East Boston, Mass. He quit abusing opioids after getting endocarditis three times. Jack Rodolico/NHPR hide caption

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Doctors Consider Ethics Of Costly Heart Surgery For People Addicted To Opioids

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Opana ER was reformulated to make it harder to crush and snort, but people abusing the drug turned to injecting it instead. And that fueled an HIV outbreak in Indiana. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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'Irresistible' By Design: It's No Accident You Can't Stop Looking At The Screen

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Scientists have genetically engineered mice (but not this cute one) to be resistant to the addictive effects of cocaine. Getty Images hide caption

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A Brain Tweak Lets Mice Abstain From Cocaine

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(Left) Bob Hardin's son has fought alcoholism for decades. (Right) Cary Dixon's adult son has been in and out of treatment for opioid addiction. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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West Virginia Families Worry About Access To Addiction Treatment Under Trump

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After about a week in detox, the men spend 60 to 90 days in this room during their treatment at Recovery Point. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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In West Virginia, Men In Recovery Look To Trump For A 'Helping Hand'

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Seth Herald for NPR

A Peer Recovery Coach Walks The Front Lines Of America's Opioid Epidemic

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'Drug Dealer, M.D.': Misunderstandings And Good Intentions Fueled Opioid Epidemic

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Eat, Don't Drink And Still Be Merry: Staying Sober Through The Holidays

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Addiction to opioids and heroin is a major public health problem, but so is alcohol abuse. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Surgeon General Murthy Wants America To Face Up To Addiction

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After a string of inpatient rehabilitation stays, Louis Casanova, who lives near Philadelphia, says he is still trying to break his addiction. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

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How We Got Here: Treating Addiction In 28 Days

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