Babajide Bello of the tech company Andela takes a selfie with AOL's Steve Case after the pair played a pickup game of pingpong. Courtesy of Andela hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Andela
Hope Or Hype: The Revolution In Africa Will Be Wireless
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/429045737/429065130" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman cultivates seaweed off the coast of Madagascar to counter overfishing. She's working with Blue Ventures, a business that supports its conservation projects by giving ecotours. Courtesy of Skoll Foundation hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Skoll Foundation

Lincoln, Neb., is home to several startups, which use the city's low cost of living and high quality of life to attract workers. Nicolas Henderson/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption Nicolas Henderson/Flickr
Silicon Prairie: Tech Startups Find A Welcoming Home In The Midwest
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/392136573/392590094" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mira Johnson took an unusual route on her journey to becoming a life coach. Courtesy of Mira Johnson hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Mira Johnson
She Left The Nightlife Behind To Become A Life Coach
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/374603563/374985628" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Revolution Foods makes healthy kids meals for both schools and stores. Co-founder Kristin Richmond says mentoring and support have been key to the success of her business. Shelly Puri/Courtesy of Revolution Foods hide caption

toggle caption Shelly Puri/Courtesy of Revolution Foods

Customers walk out of Street Boutique, parked in Shirlington Village, Va. Street Boutique is a pop-up truck that's similar to the many food trucks in the area, except it sells clothes and jewelry. James Clark/NPR hide caption

toggle caption James Clark/NPR
Make Room, Food Trucks: Mobile Fashion Stores Have Hit The Streets
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/353511677/353538223" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Whisked bakery founder Jenna Huntsberger (right) and baker's assistant Lauren Moore prepare pies in Union Kitchen, a food incubator in Washington, D.C. Huntsberger says the shared kitchen space and the business know-how she's honed there have played a big part in her success. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Meredith Rizzo/NPR
For Food Startups, Incubators Help Dish Up Success
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/336877182/341283438" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Andy Leer of maker space chain TechShop calibrates a 3-D printer at a GE-sponsored pop-up workshop in Washington, D.C. Maker spaces, which offer access to industrial-grade tools, are attracting support from governments and big companies like Ford and Lowe's. Gary Cameron/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Gary Cameron/Reuters/Landov
High-Tech Maker Spaces: Helping Little Startups Make It Big
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/306235442/308395998" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hot Bread Almacen, the retail shop of Hot Bread Kitchen, is located in the historic La Marqueta building in East Harlem, New York. Daniel Krieger for Hot Bread Kitchen hide caption

toggle caption Daniel Krieger for Hot Bread Kitchen

Customers at Honeygrow in Philadelphia can charge their cellphones while they dine using one of Doug Baldasare's kiosks. Emma Lee/For NewsWorks hide caption

toggle caption Emma Lee/For NewsWorks
Businesses Woo Customers With Free Phone-Charging Stations
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/247161881/247765490" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Two employees of Alicia's Tamales los Mayas prepare tamales in the La Cocina industrial kitchen. Alicia Villanueva, the owner, and her team produce 3,000 to 5,000 tamales every week to sell in the Bay Area. Courtesy of La Cocina hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of La Cocina

Jonathan Bush, co-founder, athenahealth, at Health Datapalooza IV, where he urged the government to release more data on health care quality and costs. FotoBriceno for Health Data Consortium/Health Data Consortium hide caption

toggle caption FotoBriceno for Health Data Consortium/Health Data Consortium
Datapalooza: A Concept, A Conference And A Movement
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/189565146/189544488" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript