Experimental drugs that clear clumps of proteins from the brains of Alzheimer's patients haven't panned out yet. Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images hide caption

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Test Of Experimental Alzheimer's Drug Finds Progress Against Brain Plaques

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Hiroyuki Yamamoto, a crossing guard in Matsudo, Japan, has been trained in how to recognize and gently approach people who are wandering, or have other signs of dementia, in ways that won't frighten them. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Japanese City Takes Community Approach To Dealing With Dementia

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Virginia Anderlini (right) was the first private client to try out Dr. Sonya Kim's new virtual reality program for the elderly, and says she's eager to see more. Kim's handful of programs are still at the demo stage. Kara Platoni/KQED hide caption

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Paul Hornback was a senior engineer and analyst for the U.S. Army when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease six years ago at age 55. His wife, Sarah, had to retire 18 months ago to care for him full time. Courtesy of the Hornbeck family hide caption

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Big Financial Costs Are Part Of Alzheimer's Toll On Families

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Each year, between 8,000 and 9,000 people nationwide complain to the government about nursing home evictions, according to federal data. That makes evictions the leading category of all nursing home complaints. shapecharge/Getty Images hide caption

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Nursing Home Evictions Strand The Disabled In Costly Hospitals

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Can't Focus? It Might Be Undiagnosed Adult ADHD

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Jeffrey Iliff (left), a brain scientist at Oregon Health & Science University, has been studying toxin removal in the brains of mice. He'll work with Bill Rooney, director of the university's Advanced Imaging Research Center, to enroll people in a similar study in 2016. Courtesy of Oregon Health & Science University hide caption

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Lack Of Deep Sleep May Set The Stage For Alzheimer's

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Forgot Something Again? It's Probably Just Normal Aging

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Delma and Antonio Salazar have been caring for Delma's mother, Agnes Williams (middle), who has severe memory problems, for the past seven years. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Alzheimer's Disease Underdiagnosed In Indian Country

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More than three hours a day could mean brain fade by middle age. Raoul Minsart/Masterfile/Corbis hide caption

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Too Much TV And Chill Could Reduce Brain Power Over Time

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Alan Hoffman, shown with his wife, Nancy, at their home in Dumfries, Va., found that his Parkinson's symptoms improved when he took a cancer drug. Claire Harbage for NPR hide caption

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Can A Cancer Drug Reverse Parkinson's Disease And Dementia?

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"My brain used to be my best friend," says Greg O'Brien, a journalist with early onset Alzheimer's. But he can't trust it anymore, he says. Alzheimer's is, in some ways, changing who he is. Amanda Kowalski and Samantha Broun for NPR hide caption

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