dementia dementia

Researchers find that dementia patients who engage in activities such as gathering photographs and talking about family see improvements in their quality of life and are less agitated. Owen Franken/Getty Images hide caption

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Owen Franken/Getty Images

New research finds that African-Americans who grow up in harsh environments and endure stressful experiences are much more likely to develop Alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Leland Bobbe/Getty Images hide caption

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Leland Bobbe/Getty Images

Stress And Poverty May Explain High Rates Of Dementia In African-Americans

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Greg unwinds a hose while doing some yardwork. Along with his failing memory, Greg has been experiencing secondary symptoms including paranoia, depression and slow healing. Amanda Kowalski for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Kowalski for NPR

More Than Memory: Coping With The Other Ills Of Alzheimer's

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Writer Greg O'Brien and his daughter, Colleen, play with Adeline, Greg's 8-month-old granddaughter. Eight years ago, Greg was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Alzheimer's Starts To Steal The Joy Of Being A Grandfather

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Small pulses of electricity to the brain have an effect on memory, new research shows. Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images

Electrical Stimulation To Boost Memory: Maybe It's All In The Timing

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A colored magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the brain of a 76-year-old patient with dementia shows the brain has atrophied and the dark brown fluid-filled spaces have become enlarged. Zephyr/Science Source hide caption

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Zephyr/Science Source

Cancer Drug That Might Slow Parkinson's, Alzheimer's Headed For Bigger Tests

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Keith Negley for NPR

Prion Test For Rare, Fatal Brain Disease Helps Families Cope

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Diseased brain tissue from an Alzheimer's patient showing amyloid plaques (in blue) located in the gray matter of the brain. Dr Cecil H Fox/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr Cecil H Fox/Science Source/Getty Images

Rosemary Navarro, 40, looks through old childhood photographs at her home in La Habra, Calif. Her mother, Rosa Maria Navarro, passed away in 2009 from Alzheimer's. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Education may help brains cope with cognitive decline, and treatments for high blood pressure and other health problems may decrease dementia risk. Alfred Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Alfred Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Dementia Risk Declines, And Education May Be One Reason Why

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Vivian Guzofsky, 88, holds a baby doll at Sunrise Senior Living in Beverly Hills, Calif. Guzofsky, who has Alzheimer's disease, is calm when taking care of the dolls. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Doll Therapy May Help Calm People With Dementia, But It Has Critics

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Rats are great at remembering where they last sniffed the strawberries. Alexey Krasaven/Flickr hide caption

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Alexey Krasaven/Flickr

Rats That Reminisce May Lead To Better Tests For Alzheimer's Drugs

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