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Prion Test For Rare, Fatal Brain Disease Helps Families Cope

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Diseased brain tissue from an Alzheimer's patient showing amyloid plaques (in blue) located in the gray matter of the brain. Dr Cecil H Fox/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr Cecil H Fox/Science Source/Getty Images

Rosemary Navarro, 40, looks through old childhood photographs at her home in La Habra, Calif. Her mother, Rosa Maria Navarro, passed away in 2009 from Alzheimer's. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Education may help brains cope with cognitive decline, and treatments for high blood pressure and other health problems may decrease dementia risk. Alfred Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Alfred Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Dementia Risk Declines, And Education May Be One Reason Why

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Vivian Guzofsky, 88, holds a baby doll at Sunrise Senior Living in Beverly Hills, Calif. Guzofsky, who has Alzheimer's disease, is calm when taking care of the dolls. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Doll Therapy May Help Calm People With Dementia, But It Has Critics

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Rats are great at remembering where they last sniffed the strawberries. Alexey Krasaven/Flickr hide caption

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Alexey Krasaven/Flickr

Rats That Reminisce May Lead To Better Tests For Alzheimer's Drugs

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Experimental drugs that clear clumps of proteins from the brains of Alzheimer's patients haven't panned out yet. Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images

Test Of Experimental Alzheimer's Drug Finds Progress Against Brain Plaques

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Hiroyuki Yamamoto, a crossing guard in Matsudo, Japan, has been trained in how to recognize and gently approach people who are wandering, or have other signs of dementia, in ways that won't frighten them. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Ina Jaffe/NPR

Japanese City Takes Community Approach To Dealing With Dementia

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Virginia Anderlini (right) was the first private client to try out Dr. Sonya Kim's new virtual reality program for the elderly, and says she's eager to see more. Kim's handful of programs are still at the demo stage. Kara Platoni/KQED hide caption

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Kara Platoni/KQED

Paul Hornback was a senior engineer and analyst for the U.S. Army when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease six years ago at age 55. His wife, Sarah, had to retire 18 months ago to care for him full time. Courtesy of the Hornbeck family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Hornbeck family

Big Financial Costs Are Part Of Alzheimer's Toll On Families

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