Privacy is one of a number of issues Apple CEO Tim Cook has called morally important. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Apple's CEO Takes A Stand — And A Risk
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Apple CEO Tim Cook says creating new software to break into a locked iPhone would be "bad news" and "we would never write it." He spoke with ABC News' World News Tonight with David Muir. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Apple CEO Tim Cook: Backdoor To iPhones Would Be Software Equivalent Of Cancer
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A U.S. magistrate judge has ordered Apple to help the FBI break into an iPhone used by one of the two shooters in the San Bernardino attack in December. iStockphoto hide caption

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Can A 1789 Law Apply To An iPhone?
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Marc Rotenberg, head of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, opposes phones that would have a built-in backdoor. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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A Privacy Advocate's View Of Ordering Apple To Help Unlock Shooter's iPhone
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"We don't collect a lot of your data and understand every detail about your life. That's just not the business that we are in," says Apple CEO Tim Cook, shown here at the NPR offices in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Apple CEO Tim Cook: 'Privacy Is A Fundamental Human Right'
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A video about the Apple Watch is shown during an Apple special event in Cupertino, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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The 2014 Tech Trends We'll Still Be Talking About Next Year
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NPR's David Greene talks with Laura Sydell
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