A rhino wakes up after its horn was trimmed at John Hume's Rhino Ranch in Klerksdorp, South Africa, on Feb. 3. South Africa's highest court is preparing to decide whether to uphold the country's domestic ban on trading rhino horn. John Hume is a private rhino owner and breeder who advocates for legalizing trade. Mujahid Safodien /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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If South Africa Lifts The Ban On Trading Rhino Horns, Will Rhinos Benefit?

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Dehorned rhinos roam a private ranch in South Africa in February. The country's Supreme Court of Appeal has lifted a domestic ban on trading rhino horns. Mujahid Safodien/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Kenya Wildlife Services ranger stands guard in front illegal stockpiles of burning elephant tusks at the Nairobi National Park on April 30, 2016. Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Up In Flames: Kenya Burns More Than 100 Tons Of Ivory

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In late July, the Brussels Royal Institute for Natural Sciences Museum was among those targeted by horn robbers. Georges Gobet /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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