Doc Todd's hip-hop album is called Combat Medicine. Hyperion Productions/Courtesy of Doc Todd hide caption

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Hyperion Productions/Courtesy of Doc Todd

'Combat Medicine:' Afghanistan Vet Seeks To Help Others Through Hip-Hop

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Afghan warlord Gulbuddin Hekmatyar speaks in eastern Afghanistan on Saturday. A prominent figure for decades in Afghanistan's war, Hekmatyar, 69, was known as the "Butcher of Kabul" when his forces rocketed the city in the 1990s. He made peace with the government and President Ashraf Ghani welcomed him back to the capital on Thursday. Mohammad Anwar Danishyar/AP hide caption

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Mohammad Anwar Danishyar/AP

The 'Butcher Of Kabul' Is Welcomed Back In Kabul

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Image from a Thursday, April 13, 2017 video released by the U.S. Department of Defense shows a GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast bomb strike on an Islamic State militant cave and tunnel systems in the Nangarhar Province in eastern Afghanistan. (U.S. Department of Defense via AP) AP hide caption

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AP

A view of the ground floor at the unfinished Kabul Grand Hotel in Kabul, Afghanistan, as seen on Aug. 1. Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction hide caption

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Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl faced a preliminary hearing in San Antonio last week. He faces a possible court-martial for walking off his base in Afghanistan in 2009. An Army investigation produced a wealth of new information on his motivations. The major general who led the inquiry recommended against a prison sentence. AP hide caption

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AP

AK, in a tan T-shirt on the left, his face blurred for his protection, was an Afghan interpreter who worked for the U.S. military. He poses with Afghan commandos in front of a controlled explosion. AK worked closely with American Jonathan Schmidt, in the dark tan shirt and a baseball cap (in the center). AK was with Schmidt when he was killed in a 2012 firefight. AK is now seeking a U.S. visa. Courtesy of Phil Schmidt hide caption

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Courtesy of Phil Schmidt

American Dad Fights For The Afghan Interpreter Who Aided His Fallen Son

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Capt. Nathan McHone was killed in Afghanistan at age 29. Courtesy of the McHone family hide caption

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Courtesy of the McHone family

A Marine's Parents' Story: Their Memories That You Should Hear

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Defense Secretary Robert Gates and President Obama salute during a farewell ceremony for Gates on June 30, 2011. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

U.S. soldiers carry a comrade injured by an improvised explosive device, or IED, in Logar province, south of Kabul, on Oct. 13. Roadside bombs are one of the biggest threats facing U.S. and Afghan troops, and insurgents keeping finding inventive ways to disguise them. Munir Uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Munir Uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images