Russ Girling, president and CEO of TransCanada Corporation, addresses the company's annual meeting in 2015 in Calgary, Alberta. Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press hide caption

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Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press

Demonstrators chant and hold up signs as they gather in front of the White House in Washington, D.C., to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline in September. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama, flanked by Secretary of State John Kerry (right) and Vice President Joe Biden, announced the Keystone XL pipeline decision Friday in the Roosevelt Room of the White House. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Miller Farm, the terminus of Van Syckel's pipeline, in 1868. The oil was pumped to Miller Farm and then transported by railroad. Drake Well Museum/Courtesy of PHMC hide caption

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Drake Well Museum/Courtesy of PHMC

Even Pickaxes Couldn't Stop The Nation's First Oil Pipeline

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House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton, R-Mich., left, clasps hands with Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., sponsor of the Senate's Keystone XL pipeline bill version, on Wednesday as lawmakers gather to urge President Obama to sign the legislation approving expansion of the Keystone XL pipeline. The House passed the Senate's version of the bill Wednesday afternoon. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., prepares to speak to the media Thursday before the Senate voted to approve the Keystone XL pipeline. Jim Lo Scalzo /EPA /Landov hide caption

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Jim Lo Scalzo /EPA /Landov

An excavator loads a truck with oil sands at the Suncor mine near the town of Fort McMurray in Alberta, Canada in 2009. Environmental groups that oppose oil sands mining have pointed to delayed and canceled projects as a sign of recent success. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Environmentalists Push To Keep Canadian Crude In The Ground

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